Why Should We Deep Condition Our Hair?

Deep conditioning (DC) is important to maintaining healthy and happy hair – natural or relaxed. If performed on a regular basis, this treatment helps our hair retain moisture and protects it “deep” within the fiber to support the hair until the next treatment. The protective action of regular conditioners last only a few days. Therefore, … Continue reading Why Should We Deep Condition Our Hair?

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International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 8 – Zainab Bangura

We continue to celebrate the women of the world, Zainab Bangura, not only on one day, International Women’s Day, but for as long as we can. Enjoy the post, original posted on Huffington Post: 8. Zainab Bangura pushed countries to recognize that sexual violence in conflict has to stop. As the U.N. special representative on sexual violence in conflict, … Continue reading International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 8 – Zainab Bangura

International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 7 – Lena Klimova

We continue to celebrate the women of the world, Lena Klimova, not only on one day, International Women’s Day, but for as long as we can. Enjoy the post, original posted on Huffington Post: 7. Lena Klimova gave Russian gay teens a voice online. Just days before the Sochi Winter Olympics opened in February, young journalist Lena Klimova was charged under … Continue reading International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 7 – Lena Klimova

International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 6 – Mehrezia Labidi

We continue to celebrate the women of the world, Mehrezia Labidi, not only on one day, International Women’s Day, but for as long as we can. Enjoy the post, original posted on Huffington Post: 6. Mehrezia Labidi helped enshrine gender equality in Tunisia’s post-Arab Spring constitution. As vice-president of Tunisia’s constituent assembly, Mehrezia Labidi led the tumultuous debates over … Continue reading International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 6 – Mehrezia Labidi

International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 5 – Ukrainian pop icon Ruslana

We continue to celebrate the women of the world, Ukrainian pop icon Ruslana, not only on one day, International Women’s Day, but for as long as we can. Enjoy the post, original posted on Huffington Post: 5. Ukrainian pop icon Ruslana became a champion of the country’s protest movement. Ruslana is one of Ukraine’s most famous pop singers and … Continue reading International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 5 – Ukrainian pop icon Ruslana

International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 4 on Catherine Samba-Panza

We continue to celebrate the women of the world, Catherine Samba-Panza, not only on one day, International Women’s Day, but for as long as we can. Enjoy the post, original posted on Huffington Post: 4. The Central African Republic’s interim president Catherine Samba-Panza gave a violence-stricken nation new hope. Catherine Samba-Panza, a women’s rights activist and reconciliation advocate who is known … Continue reading International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 4 on Catherine Samba-Panza

International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 3 on Azizah Al-Yousef

We continue to celebrate the women of the world, Azizah Al-Yousef , not only on one day, International Women’s Day, but for as long as we can. Enjoy the post, original posted on Huffington Post: 3. Azizah Al-Yousef began a campaign to end Saudi Arabia’s oppressive male guardianship system. Azizah al-Yousif has been a thorn in … Continue reading International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 3 on Azizah Al-Yousef

International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 2 on Xiao Meili

We continue to celebrate the women of the world, Xiao Meili, not only on one day, International Women’s Day, but for as long as we can. Enjoy the post, original posted on Huffington Post: 2. Xiao Meili put a taboo subject back on the map. Xiao Meili set off the remarkable journey in late 2013 … Continue reading International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 2 on Xiao Meili

International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 1 on Jamila Bayaz

Reblogged

Original posted on Huffington Post:

Happy International Women’s Day! It’s a day we celebrate the women and girls in our lives and also look to others around the world. Today in Budapest, I was out with my boyfriend and was amazed by the sheer number of flower vendors and florists which had just popped up over-night!

As Andrew quipped, the difference between love and lust can really be seen in places like this. We stopped at a florist where I was treated to a beautiful bunch of tulips and he saw a man staggering under the weight of what must have been 30 or 40 long-stemmed red roses. Whereas I was told “not to go too mad and buy the whole shop”!

But I digress – I want to talk about International Women’s Day, not just my Saturday!

Quite often, news outlets and NGOs are quick to share links about the tragedies faced by girls around the world. Malala Yousafzai’s face and story is all over the internet today, alongside stories about the ongoing global struggle against child marriage, rape, torture and abuse.

But this year, I wanted to look at some positive examples of female empowerment and some cheerier stories.

I found this on the Huffington Post and have shamelessly stolen it. I find this is a much more life-affirming way to celebrate women. Let’s look at what has been achieved and what we have to proud of as a global society, because if we keep looking at all the terrible atrocities faced by women every day, we’ll never want to try fighting the fight. These are the sort of stories which keep me motivated to keep writing about women’s rights so I hope you get something out of it too!

1. Afghanistan’s first female police chief showed the world what courage looks like.

Col. Jamila Bayaz was appointed to run security in the Kabul’s District 1 in January, becoming the first woman in such a senior front line role. The mother-of-5 is responsible for policing an area of the Afghan capital that includes the presidential palace, government ministries and the central bank. “This is a chance not just for me, but for the women of Afghanistan,” she told NBC. “I will not waste it. I will prove that we can handle this burden.”

Women in Afghanistan have faced a steep battle to reenter the workforce and public life after the end of the Taliban’s restrictive rule. They still face considerable obstacles including discrimination from an ultraconservative society and the threat of militant attacks. Afghan policewomen have been targeted by insurgents and several women in public office were assassinated in 2013, according to the Associated Press. Bayaz is undaunted: “I am ready to serve, I am not scared nor am I afraid,” she told AP.

jamila bayaz

jamila bayaz

Col. Jamila Bayaz talks on the phone at her office in Kabul, Afghanistan, Jan. 16, 2014. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)

The Soapbox

Happy International Women’s Day! It’s a day we celebrate the women and girls in our lives and also look to others around the world. Today in Budapest, I was out with my boyfriend and was amazed by the sheer number of flower vendors and florists which had just popped up over-night!

As Andrew quipped, the difference between love and lust can really be seen in places like this. We stopped at a florist where I was treated to a beautiful bunch of tulips and he saw a man staggering under the weight of what must have been 30 or 40 long-stemmed red roses. Whereas I was told “not to go too mad and buy the whole shop”!

DSC_0013

But I digress – I want to talk about International Women’s Day, not just my Saturday!

Quite often, news outlets and NGOs are quick to share links about the tragedies faced by girls…

View original post 1,529 more words

International Women’s Day: Say No To Quotas!

Re-blogged from Veritas:

Today is being celebrated the world over as International Women’s Day; a day to celebrate the achievements of those of the fairer sex, while highlighting the work that is still to be done on behalf of women in some of the forgotten corners of our world. Perhaps inevitably the conversation today will turn to towards finding solutions to the real and perceived inequalities facing women. That conversation will undoubtedly rest on quota systems. In fact, a member of the Jamaican Senate has already raised the issue, arguing that it would compensate for the disparity between men and women in the Parliament.  I’m no expert in these matters, and I do not pretend to be – these are my opinions having thought about the issue. I have no doubt that the Senator has good intentions, but I cannot support quotas on the basis of gender, especially in political representation. Here’s why.

women leaders

Quota systems in politics exist to solve inherent or structural inequalities. That is, the state engineers what is thought to be a desired result by allocating or reserving a certain amount of seats in the parliament for women, on the basis that they are women. That would be the first qualifier. While advocacy groups here in Jamaica such as the 51% Coalition have argued that the women who would occupy these reserved seats/spaces are to be qualified, they do not deny that the basic qualifier would be gender. It raises the question, is there inherent and structural inequality in Jamaican politics? By this I mean, are women prevented from running for, and holding public office simply because they are women? Of course not. A female colleague of mine only this morning tweeted that she is thankful to have been born and raised in a country where being a female was not a deterrent or an impediment. We must then question why we need to engineer the democratic process to reflect what we think it ought to look like. This betrays our impatience with the democratic process. We believe the pluralist society we consider ideal is taking shape too slowly for our liking, so we must necessarily meddle, engineer and interfere to suit or preferences. That is dangerous. That is to be rejected.

Quotas amount to affirmative action, and just as any other beneficiary of affirmative action is seen as less than, or only having attained the position they occupy because  whatever predetermined trait commended them to it, and no matter what their independent qualifications are, we run the real risk of them being shadowed by the quota system. It is my considered opinion that such a move would set back the process, rather than further it.

By favouring one sex over another, we are creating an atmosphere of resentment and animosity; the state will be playing favourites. That is not the role of government, that is not the role of the state. We diminish the capacity of women to make advancements on merit, and single them out for special treatment and remedial action. How would this be in their best interest? How would we have advanced the cause of women by using their gender as the predominant qualifier? Am I the only one who finds that offensive?

Finally, there is an inherent problem with quotas which allows for manipulation. The state ought not to play favourites, as mentioned before. Therefore, if we create quotas on the basis of gender, we may have to do it on the basis of race, then religious persuasion, or political persuasion, and possibly even sexual orientation. Only that would be fair. My question is, where would one draw the line? There is an inherent problem with seeking to adopt a strictly pluralist society, and that problem is chaos. While I can appreciate the good intentions of those who propose quotas, I believe it complicates the problem, rather than fixes it. Democracy was not intended to be engineered or manipulated by the state and its agents; it was intended to unfold at the ballot, by the people, through their vote. If the people want more women, Jews, Catholics, homosexuals, Rastafarians, blacks etc. in Parliament, let them vote them in. Do not reserve seats for them because of predetermined characteristics. I cannot support that.

GRASSROOTS JAMAICA

ImageToday is being celebrated the world over as International Women’s Day; a day to celebrate the achievements of those of the fairer sex, while highlighting the work that is still to be done on behalf of women in some of the forgotten corners of our world. Perhaps inevitably the conversation today will turn to towards finding solutions to the real and perceived inequalities facing women. That conversation will undoubtedly rest on quota systems. In fact, a member of the Jamaican Senate has already raised the issue, arguing that it would compensate for the disparity between men and women in the Parliament.  I’m no expert in these matters, and I do not pretend to be – these are my opinions having thought about the issue. I have no doubt that the Senator has good intentions, but I cannot support quotas on the basis of gender, especially in political representation. Here’s why.

View original post 557 more words

Usain Bolt: How the world’s fastest man built a business empire

Usain Bolt is more than a veteran Olympic star. He's a brand -- a track and field icon with an international following.   Bolt, who is Jamaican, has deals with Puma, Nissan (NSANF), Hublot, Visa (V), Virgin Media and Japan's All Nippon Airways. There's also Optus, an Australian telecommunications company, and Enertor, which sells sports … Continue reading Usain Bolt: How the world’s fastest man built a business empire

Rio 2016 Olympics: Jamaican Deuce Carter grabs second chance in rain-hit hurdles

Rio 2016 Olympics: Jamaican Deuce Carter Grabs Second Chance In Men’s 110m Hurdles

RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - Jamaica's Deuce Carter advanced to the semi-finals of the Olympic 110m hurdles at the second attempt on Monday after he was allowed to take part in a re-run heat after rain played havoc with the competition. Jamaica's Omar McLeod splashed through the puddles to win the first heat but compatriot … Continue reading Rio 2016 Olympics: Jamaican Deuce Carter Grabs Second Chance In Men’s 110m Hurdles

Rio 2016 Olympics: Results for Jamaican Danniel Thomas in Women’s Shot Put & Fedrick Dacres in Men’s Discus

Aug 12, 2016 sees the commencement of all track and field events at the Rio 2016 Olympics. Jamaica's Fedrick , missing the first two throws, throws 50.69M on 3rd and final attempt of Men's Discus Throw Group A. Danniel Thomas finished 14th position in Group B of Women's Shot Put after 3 attempts of 16.70M, 16.43M and 16.99M. Both … Continue reading Rio 2016 Olympics: Results for Jamaican Danniel Thomas in Women’s Shot Put & Fedrick Dacres in Men’s Discus

womens 100m prelim

Rio 2016 Olympics: Results for Women’s 100m Preliminary Round

Aug 12, 2016 sees the commencement of all track and field events at the Rio 2016 Olympics. FRIDAY AUGUST 12 MORNING SESSION 7:30 a.m.: Men’s Discus Throw qualifying round, Group A qualifying 8:05 a.m.: Women’s Shot Put qualifying round, Groups A and B 8:10 a.m.: Men’s 800m Round 1 8:55 a.m.: Men’s Discus Throw qualifying … Continue reading Rio 2016 Olympics: Results for Women’s 100m Preliminary Round

Two Bullets Hit Rio 2016 Olympic Equestrian Site, one fired at blimp

RIO DE JANEIRO – Officials at the 2016 Rio Olympics aren’t dodging inquiries as those attending the Games worry about dodging bullets in the Deodoro region of the city. Three separate incidents of gunfire (or alleged gunfire) have occurred in Deodoro, which sits about 30 minutes away from the Olympic Park and is home to … Continue reading Two Bullets Hit Rio 2016 Olympic Equestrian Site, one fired at blimp

UWI To Honor Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce With Honorary Degree, Doctor of Laws (LLD)

KINGSTON, Jamaica — Track and field super star Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is one of three people who will be conferred with honorary degrees by the University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona at its graduation ceremonies scheduled for October 28 – 29. The other awardees will be American actor, producer and humanitarian, Daniel “Danny” Glover, and … Continue reading UWI To Honor Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce With Honorary Degree, Doctor of Laws (LLD)

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Is the Winner of Best ‘Opening Ceremony Hair’

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce carried the Jamaican flag as she led the Jamaican contingent inside the into Maracana stadium during the opening ceremony of the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Fraser-Pryce was selected to be Jamaica’s 11th flag-bearer. According to BBC Sport, the winner for the ‘best Opening Ceremony hair’ is Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. Usain Bolt, who … Continue reading Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Is the Winner of Best ‘Opening Ceremony Hair’

Jamaican Officials Satisfied With #Rio2016 #Olympics Village 

RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil: Chef de Mission of Jamaica’s team to the 2016 Olympic Games, Vishu Tolan, says preparations for the team’s full arrival in the Athletes’ Village have gone smoothly. Tolan, who arrived in Rio de Janeiro on Monday was also pleased with the state of Jamaica’s accommodations in light of complaints from other … Continue reading Jamaican Officials Satisfied With #Rio2016 #Olympics Village 

Nike’s New Spike Prepares Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce for Historical Race

The 100 meters, for all its brevity, is best understood as a series of moments. Sprint experts break the event into three phases — drive, maximum velocity and maintenance. Sprinters tackle these phases through either a stride-rate or stride-length approach, meaning some sprinters are superb off the blocks; others, expert at catching pace deep in … Continue reading Nike’s New Spike Prepares Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce for Historical Race

yohan blake wins 100m

Watch: Yohan Blake, Nickel Ashmeade, Julian Forte and Warren Weir Through to 200m Finals #JaSeniorTrials

With enough controversy to last a year, the Jamaican male sprinters, Yohan Blake, Nickel Ashmeade, Julian Forte and Warren Weir  choose to play it safe in qualifying for the men's 200 meters finals. It will be run on Sunday, July 3, 3016 at the National Stadium, in Kingston Jamaica. Having been disqualified from the men's 100 … Continue reading Watch: Yohan Blake, Nickel Ashmeade, Julian Forte and Warren Weir Through to 200m Finals #JaSeniorTrials