Willie Lynch Letter: The Making of A Slave

12 Years a Slave

When we look back at life, our experiences and want to know why people operate the way they do, especially for black people, the letter below explains it all. Here in Jamaica, Willie Lynch’s slave psychology is rife in our society.

I hope you gain and understanding and change those things, which you recognize, for the better.

Willie Lynch Letter: The Making of A Slave

Willie Lynch : The Making of A Slave

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This speech was said to have been delivered by Willie Lynch on the bank of the James River in the colony of Virginia in 1712.  Lynch was a British slave owner in the West Indies. He was invited to the colony of Virginia in 1712 to teach his methods to slave owners there.

Willie Lynch Letter: The Making of A Slave

Greetings, Gentlemen.

I greet you here on the bank of the James River in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and twelve. First, I shall thank you, the gentlemen of the Colony of Virginia, for bringing me here. I am here to help you solve some of your problems with slaves. Your invitation reached me on my modest plantation in the West Indies, where I have experimented with some of the newest, and still the oldest, methods for control of slaves. Ancient Rome would envy us if my program is implemented. As our boat sailed south on the James River, named for our illustrious King, whose version of the Bible we cherish, I saw enough to know that your problem is not unique. While Rome used cords of wood as crosses for standing human bodies along its highways in great numbers, you are here using the tree and the rope on occasions. I caught the whiff of a dead slave hanging from a tree, a couple miles back. You are not only losing valuable stock by hangings, you are having uprisings, slaves are running away, your crops are sometimes left in the fields too long for maximum profit, you suffer occasional fires, your animals are killed. Gentlemen, you know what your problems are; I do not need to elaborate. I am not here to enumerate your problems, I am here to introduce you to a method of solving them.

In my bag here, I HAVE A FULL PROOF METHOD FOR CONTROLLING YOUR BLACK SLAVES. I guarantee every one of you that, if installed correctly, IT WILL CONTROL THE SLAVES FOR AT LEAST 300 HUNDREDS YEARS.

My method is simple. Any member of your family or your overseer can use it. I HAVE OUTLINED A NUMBER OF DIFFERENCES AMONG THE SLAVES; AND I TAKE THESE DIFFERENCES AND MAKE THEM BIGGER. I USE FEAR, DISTRUST AND ENVY FOR CONTROL PURPOSES. These methods have worked on my modest plantation in the West Indies and it will work throughout the South. Take this simple little list of differences and think about them.

On top of my list is “AGE,” but it’s there only because it starts with an “a.” The second is “COLOR” or shade. There is INTELLIGENCE, SIZE, SEX, SIZES OF PLANTATIONS, STATUS on plantations, ATTITUDE of owners, whether the slaves live in the valley, on a hill, East, West, North, South, have fine hair, course hair, or is tall or short. Now that you have a list of differences, I shall give you an outline of action, but before that, I shall assure you that DISTRUST IS STRONGER THAN TRUST AND ENVY STRONGER THAN ADULATION, RESPECT OR ADMIRATION.

The Black slaves after receiving this indoctrination shall carry on and will become self-refueling and self-generating for HUNDREDS of years, maybe THOUSANDS. Don’t forget, you must pitch the OLD black male vs. the YOUNG black male, and the YOUNG black male against the OLD black male. You must use the DARK skin slaves vs. the LIGHT skin slaves, and the LIGHT skin slaves vs. the DARK skin slaves. You must use the FEMALE vs. the MALE, and the MALE vs. the FEMALE. You must also have white servants and overseers [who] distrust all Blacks. But it is NECESSARY THAT YOUR SLAVES TRUST AND DEPEND ON US. THEY MUST LOVE, RESPECT AND TRUST ONLY US. Gentlemen, these kits are your keys to control. Use them. Have your wives and children use them, never miss an opportunity. IF USED INTENSELY FOR ONE YEAR, THE SLAVES THEMSELVES WILL REMAIN PERPETUALLY DISTRUSTFUL.

Thank you, Gentlemen.”

Please Note: The year 2012 was 300 years since – 1712 – that Willie, gave his speech.

Bob Marley: The Shooting of a Wailer by Cameron Crowe, January 13, 1977


Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known Jamaican Reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house…

Midnight Raver

Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house. Another man, described by one observer as looking like “a…

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Dancehall: The Story of Jamaican Dancehall Culture By Beth Lesser (my review)


How many of us have ever seen photos of artists like Nicodemus, Josie Wales, Yami Bolo, Papa San, Peter Metro, Lone Ranger, Coco Tea, Sister Nancy etc in the prime? The photos are iconic.

I have bought this book many a times to give as presents to friends when on travels to Jamaica and Canada and the recipients all have loved it.

Even now at my house in Old Harbour all my friends want to buy my own copy. No chance!

Every library in Jamaica should have a copy. These artistes in the photos did not have much if any airplay on radio in Jamaica at the time which has meant that reggae fans overseas have more appreciation for the excellent output that made Jamaica well known and respect in countries as further afield as Poland and Japan. So the younger generation have no idea who these artistes were but if they saw these photos the kids could be inspired to dig further.

Be warned – its a very weighty book but important addition to gaining understanding to Jamaican music……

On a slightly side issue……

When you travel around Jamaica you will see new streets and places named after famous athletes, politicians etc. Even in Portmore you see areas called Sandown, Kempton and Aintree which are racecourses in the UK. What’s that about?

But given Jamaica’s greatest consistent global (& respected )export – has been our music – how many of our artistes have ever been publicly acknowledged in some way for their contribution? On the kind of scale like some of our athletes or politicians?

I would love to see a Jackie Mittoo Centre of Music, Jacob Miller Avenue, Delroy Wilson Park, Mighty Diamond Housing Scheme. These people have done wonders in their short but inspiring lives and revered worldwide.

Lets give them the public respect they richly deserve.

wingswithme

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0955481716/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

Without a doubt one of the most important books ever published about the history of post independent Jamaican music. Great for the coffee table or the verandah! A copy of this book would be a great educational reference for young Jamaicans especially who have no clue as to that pivotal era in music.

The photos capture a wonderful period in Jamaican music. As for the poses you just going to LOL when you see them.

How many of us have ever seen photos of artists like Nicodemus, Josie Wales, Yami Bolo, Papa San, Peter Metro, Lone Ranger, Coco Tea, Sister Nancy etc in the prime? The photos are iconic.

I have bought this book many a times to give as presents to friends when on travels to Jamaica and Canada and the recipients all have loved it.

Even now at my house in Old Harbour all my friends want…

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Jamaican History: Jamaica National Pledge


 

NATIONAL PLEDGE 
For use at the beginning and end of term, and on other special occasions.

Before God and all mankind, I pledge the love and loyalty of my heart, the wisdom and courage of my mind, the strength and vigour of my body in the service of my fellow citizens; I promise to stand up for Justice, Brotherhood and Peace, to work diligently and creatively, to think generously and honestly, so that Jamaica may, under God, increase in beauty, fellowship and prosperity, and play her part in advancing the welfare of the whole human race.

SHORTER PLEDGE FOR SCHOOLS 
Before God and all mankind, I pledge my love, my loyalty and skills, in the service of Jamaica and my fellow citizens. I promise to work diligently and to help build a prosperous and peaceful nation.

The History and Influence of Jamaican Music

the skatalites
the skatalites

This is an old but interesting article from 2012 on the trajectory of Jamaican music, starting with mento and ska, then the reggae greats, and finally their influence on modern rhythms, such as dancehall, reggaeton, trip-hop, and dubstep.

[It is] impossible to quantify the remarkable impact the island has had on global culture, thanks in large part to a legacy of musical innovation stretching back over 50 years. Without Jamaica, the world would never have known the sounds of ska, reggae or even hip-hop, all of which were born on this tiny island in the West Indies.

THE ROOTS: Though most people associate the island with the laid-back rhythms of reggae, Jamaica’s first major musical movement was the more uptempo sound of ska. Combining elements of Caribbean mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm & blues, ska arose in the wake of American soldiers stationed in Jamaica during and after World War II, and its celebratory sound coincided with Jamaica’s independence from the UK in 1962. Early acts such as The Skatalites and The Wailers remain legends today, influencing ‘80s acts such as Madness, The Specials and English Beat and ‘90s icons such as Sublime, No Doubt and the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. But by the late ‘60s, as American soul music was becoming slower and smoother, ska began to evolve into reggae, whose central themes of peace, love, justice and equality mirrored the ideals of the American counter-cultural movement of the same era.

THE HEART: The dawn of reggae found Jamaican music spreading throughout the world, with Bob Marley & the Wailers leading the charge. With lyrics that balanced sociopolitical discourse, religious themes and messages of love and positivity, songs such as “Get Up, Stand Up” and “I Shot the Sheriff” made them international superstars (particularly after the latter was covered by Eric Clapton in 1974). But they weren’t the only Jamaican artists to break out: Acts such as ex-Wailer Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Burning Spear, Black Uhuru and Culture all emerged as stars on the global stage. Wailers producer Lee “Scratch” Perry was chosen to work with British punk legends The Clash, while British bands such as The Police and Steel Pulse proved reggae’s influence was spreading far beyond Jamaica’s borders. In 1985, the Grammy Awards introduced a Best Reggae Album category, signaling the Jamaican sound’s firm place in the mainstream….

THE BRANCHES: While the influence of ska and reggae cannot be overstated, it was another Jamaican music sub-genre that ultimately changed the world. Popularized by production wizards such as Lee “Scratch” Perry and Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Burning Spear, Black Uhuru and Culture is a largely instrumental version of reggae originally used to test sound systems. To hype the crowds at the parties and nightclubs where the DJs performed, they would get on the microphone and “toast” in hip rhyming patterns. When Kingston native Clive “DJ Kool Herc” Campbell moved to the Bronx, his legendary parties gave birth to the sound now known as hip-hop, influencing practically every DJ and MC that followed. In recent years a bevy of popular musical forms have evolved out of Jamaican styles, including dancehall, reggaeton and trip-hop. Whether it’s Bob’s son Ziggy Marley singing the theme song to the children’s TV show Arthur, pop star Sean Kingston or the techno hybrid known as dubstep, these days Jamaican music is everywhere, ensuring the little island will continue to be a big influence for many years to come.

Read more at The History and Influence of Jamaican Music

Repeating Islands

theskatalites

This is an old but interesting article from 2012 on the trajectory of Jamaican music, starting with mento and ska, then the reggae greats, and finally their influence on modern rhythms, such as dancehall, reggaeton, trip-hop, and dubstep. Here are excerpts from Bret Love’s assessment of the influence of Jamaican music.

[It is] impossible to quantify the remarkable impact the island has had on global culture, thanks in large part to a legacy of musical innovation stretching back over 50 years. Without Jamaica, the world would never have known the sounds of ska, reggae or even hip-hop, all of which were born on this tiny island in the West Indies.

THE ROOTS: Though most people associate the island with the laid-back rhythms of reggae, Jamaica’s first major musical movement was the more uptempo sound of ska. Combining elements of Caribbean mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm & blues, ska arose in the wake…

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Jamaican History: Jamaica National Fruit – The Ackee


 

National Fruit – The Ackee (Blighia sapida)

“Carry me ackee go a Linstead Market, not a quattie wud sell” is a line in the popular Jamaican folk song ‘Linstead Market’. Ackee is the national fruit of Jamaica as well as a component of the national dish – ackee and codfish.

Unripened Ackee PodsAlthough the ackee is not indigenous to Jamaica, it has remarkable historic associations. Originally, it was imported to the island from West Africa, probably on a slave ship. Now it grows here luxuriantly, producing large quantities of edible fruit each year.

Ackee is derived from the original name Ankye which comes from the Twi language of Ghana. The botanical name of the fruit – Blighia Sapida – was given in honour of Captain William Bligh of “Mutiny on the Bounty” fame, who in 1793 took plants of the fruit from Jamaica to England. Captain Bligh also brought the first breadfruit to Jamaica. Before this, the ackee was unknown to science. In 1778 Dr Thomas Clarke, one of the earliest propogators of the tree, introduced it to the eastern parishes.

The ackee tree grows up to 15.24m (50ft) under favourable conditions. It bears large red and yellow fruit 7.5 – 10 cm (3-4 in.) long. When ripe these fruits burst into sections revealing shiny black round seeds on top of a yellow aril which is partially edible.

ackeeThere are two main types of ackee identified by the colour of the aril. That with a soft yellow aril is known as ‘butter’ and ‘cheese’ is hard and cream-coloured. Ackee contains a poison (hypoglcin) which is dissipated when it is properly harvested and cooked. The fruit should not be gathered until the pods open naturally. In addition, the aril must be properly cleaned of red fibre and the cooking water discarded.

Jamaica is the only place where the fruit is widely eaten. However, it has been introduced into most of the other Caribbean islands (for example, Trinidad, Grenada, Antigua and Barbados), Central America and Florida, where it is known by different names and does not thrive in economic quantities. Jamaican canned ackee is now exported and sold in markets patronized by expatriate Jamaicans.

Ackee is a very delicious fruit and when boiled and cooked with seasoning and salt fish or salt pork, it is considered one of Jamaica’s greatest delicacies.

 

Jamaican History : Jamaica Flag


 

The Jamaica National Flag

jamaica-flag

The Jamaica National Flag was first raised on Independence Day, August 6, 1962. It signifies the birth of our nation.

The Flag brings to mind memories of past achievements and gives inspiration towards further success. It is flown on many triumphant occasions, showing the pride that Jamaicans have in their country and in the flag itself.

Design

A bipartisan committee of the Jamaica House of Representatives designed the Jamaican Flag which consists of a diagonal cross with four triangles placed side by side. The diagonal cross is gold; the top and bottom triangles are green; and the hoist and fly (side) triangles are black.

Symbolism

“The sun shineth, the land is green and the people are strong and creative” is the symbolism of the colours of the flag. Black depicts the strength and creativity of the people; Gold, the natural wealth and beauty of sunlight; and green, hope and agricultural resources.

Code for use of the Jamaican Flag 

· The Jamaican flag should never be allowed to touch the ground or floor. It should not be flown or used only for decorative purposes on anything that is for temporary use and is likely to be discarded, except on state occasions.

· The flag should never be smaller than any other flag flown at the same time.

· When the flag becomes worn and must be replaced, burn it.

· Do not place any other flag above or to the right of the Jamaican flag, except at foreign embassies, consulates and missions.

· Do not raise any foreign flag publicly, unless the Jamaican flag is also flown, except at foreign embassies, consulates and missions.

· The flag shouldn’t be draped over vehicles, except on military, police and state occasions