Willie Lynch Letter: The Making of A Slave

When we look back at life, our experiences and want to know why people operate the way they do, especially for black people, the letter below explains it all. Here in Jamaica, Willie Lynch's slave psychology is rife in our society. I hope you gain and understanding and change those things, which you recognize, for … Continue reading Willie Lynch Letter: The Making of A Slave

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Bob Marley: The Shooting of a Wailer by Cameron Crowe, January 13, 1977

Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known Jamaican Reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house…

Midnight Raver

Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house. Another man, described by one observer as looking like “a…

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Dancehall: The Story of Jamaican Dancehall Culture By Beth Lesser (my review)

How many of us have ever seen photos of artists like Nicodemus, Josie Wales, Yami Bolo, Papa San, Peter Metro, Lone Ranger, Coco Tea, Sister Nancy etc in the prime? The photos are iconic.

I have bought this book many a times to give as presents to friends when on travels to Jamaica and Canada and the recipients all have loved it.

Even now at my house in Old Harbour all my friends want to buy my own copy. No chance!

Every library in Jamaica should have a copy. These artistes in the photos did not have much if any airplay on radio in Jamaica at the time which has meant that reggae fans overseas have more appreciation for the excellent output that made Jamaica well known and respect in countries as further afield as Poland and Japan. So the younger generation have no idea who these artistes were but if they saw these photos the kids could be inspired to dig further.

Be warned – its a very weighty book but important addition to gaining understanding to Jamaican music……

On a slightly side issue……

When you travel around Jamaica you will see new streets and places named after famous athletes, politicians etc. Even in Portmore you see areas called Sandown, Kempton and Aintree which are racecourses in the UK. What’s that about?

But given Jamaica’s greatest consistent global (& respected )export – has been our music – how many of our artistes have ever been publicly acknowledged in some way for their contribution? On the kind of scale like some of our athletes or politicians?

I would love to see a Jackie Mittoo Centre of Music, Jacob Miller Avenue, Delroy Wilson Park, Mighty Diamond Housing Scheme. These people have done wonders in their short but inspiring lives and revered worldwide.

Lets give them the public respect they richly deserve.

wingswithme

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0955481716/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

Without a doubt one of the most important books ever published about the history of post independent Jamaican music. Great for the coffee table or the verandah! A copy of this book would be a great educational reference for young Jamaicans especially who have no clue as to that pivotal era in music.

The photos capture a wonderful period in Jamaican music. As for the poses you just going to LOL when you see them.

How many of us have ever seen photos of artists like Nicodemus, Josie Wales, Yami Bolo, Papa San, Peter Metro, Lone Ranger, Coco Tea, Sister Nancy etc in the prime? The photos are iconic.

I have bought this book many a times to give as presents to friends when on travels to Jamaica and Canada and the recipients all have loved it.

Even now at my house in Old Harbour all my friends want…

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the skatalites

The History and Influence of Jamaican Music

This is an old but interesting article from 2012 on the trajectory of Jamaican music, starting with mento and ska, then the reggae greats, and finally their influence on modern rhythms, such as dancehall, reggaeton, trip-hop, and dubstep.

[It is] impossible to quantify the remarkable impact the island has had on global culture, thanks in large part to a legacy of musical innovation stretching back over 50 years. Without Jamaica, the world would never have known the sounds of ska, reggae or even hip-hop, all of which were born on this tiny island in the West Indies.

THE ROOTS: Though most people associate the island with the laid-back rhythms of reggae, Jamaica’s first major musical movement was the more uptempo sound of ska. Combining elements of Caribbean mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm & blues, ska arose in the wake of American soldiers stationed in Jamaica during and after World War II, and its celebratory sound coincided with Jamaica’s independence from the UK in 1962. Early acts such as The Skatalites and The Wailers remain legends today, influencing ‘80s acts such as Madness, The Specials and English Beat and ‘90s icons such as Sublime, No Doubt and the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. But by the late ‘60s, as American soul music was becoming slower and smoother, ska began to evolve into reggae, whose central themes of peace, love, justice and equality mirrored the ideals of the American counter-cultural movement of the same era.

THE HEART: The dawn of reggae found Jamaican music spreading throughout the world, with Bob Marley & the Wailers leading the charge. With lyrics that balanced sociopolitical discourse, religious themes and messages of love and positivity, songs such as “Get Up, Stand Up” and “I Shot the Sheriff” made them international superstars (particularly after the latter was covered by Eric Clapton in 1974). But they weren’t the only Jamaican artists to break out: Acts such as ex-Wailer Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Burning Spear, Black Uhuru and Culture all emerged as stars on the global stage. Wailers producer Lee “Scratch” Perry was chosen to work with British punk legends The Clash, while British bands such as The Police and Steel Pulse proved reggae’s influence was spreading far beyond Jamaica’s borders. In 1985, the Grammy Awards introduced a Best Reggae Album category, signaling the Jamaican sound’s firm place in the mainstream….

THE BRANCHES: While the influence of ska and reggae cannot be overstated, it was another Jamaican music sub-genre that ultimately changed the world. Popularized by production wizards such as Lee “Scratch” Perry and Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Burning Spear, Black Uhuru and Culture is a largely instrumental version of reggae originally used to test sound systems. To hype the crowds at the parties and nightclubs where the DJs performed, they would get on the microphone and “toast” in hip rhyming patterns. When Kingston native Clive “DJ Kool Herc” Campbell moved to the Bronx, his legendary parties gave birth to the sound now known as hip-hop, influencing practically every DJ and MC that followed. In recent years a bevy of popular musical forms have evolved out of Jamaican styles, including dancehall, reggaeton and trip-hop. Whether it’s Bob’s son Ziggy Marley singing the theme song to the children’s TV show Arthur, pop star Sean Kingston or the techno hybrid known as dubstep, these days Jamaican music is everywhere, ensuring the little island will continue to be a big influence for many years to come.

Read more at The History and Influence of Jamaican Music

Repeating Islands

theskatalites

This is an old but interesting article from 2012 on the trajectory of Jamaican music, starting with mento and ska, then the reggae greats, and finally their influence on modern rhythms, such as dancehall, reggaeton, trip-hop, and dubstep. Here are excerpts from Bret Love’s assessment of the influence of Jamaican music.

[It is] impossible to quantify the remarkable impact the island has had on global culture, thanks in large part to a legacy of musical innovation stretching back over 50 years. Without Jamaica, the world would never have known the sounds of ska, reggae or even hip-hop, all of which were born on this tiny island in the West Indies.

THE ROOTS: Though most people associate the island with the laid-back rhythms of reggae, Jamaica’s first major musical movement was the more uptempo sound of ska. Combining elements of Caribbean mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm & blues, ska arose in the wake…

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Jamaican History: Jamaica National Flower – Lignum Vitae

National Flower – Lignum Vitae (Guiacum officinale) The Lignum Vitae was found here by Christopher Columbus. Its name, when translated from Latin, means “wood of life” – probably adopted because of its medicinal qualities. The short, compact tree is native to continental tropical American and the West Indies. In Jamaica it grows best in the … Continue reading Jamaican History: Jamaica National Flower – Lignum Vitae

Jamaican History: Jamaica National Bird

    National Bird - The Doctor-Bird (Trochilus polytmus) or Swallow-Tail Hummingbird The doctor bird or swallow tail humming bird, is one of the most outstanding of the 320 species of hummingbirds. It lives only in Jamaica. These birds’ beautiful feathers have no counterpart in the entire bird population and they produce iridescent colours characterstic … Continue reading Jamaican History: Jamaica National Bird

black uhuru islandpen.wordpress.com

Jamaican History: Introduction to the Rastafari, History of Jamaica and The Rastafarian Movement

Introduction to the Rastafari Phenomenon By Nathaniel Samuel Murrell Seldom has such a relatively small cultural phenomenon as Rastafari attracted so much attention from young people, the media, and scholars in the fields of religion, anthropology, politics, and sociology. The signature long, natty dreads on the heads of Rastafarians, who fearlessly chant down Babylon (Western political and economic … Continue reading Jamaican History: Introduction to the Rastafari, History of Jamaica and The Rastafarian Movement

Jamaica Festival Song History: 1977 – Watch Eric Donaldson with “Sweet Jamaica”

Jamaica Festival Song winner for 1977 - Eric Donaldson with "Sweet Jamaica" Lyrics from: http://www.wowlyrics.com Sweet Jamaica is now on the move. Help me with my song and let the people dem come sing along. Tek up yu cutlass, yu shovel and yu hoe. Tek up yu boots dem, people let us go. Call out the … Continue reading Jamaica Festival Song History: 1977 – Watch Eric Donaldson with “Sweet Jamaica”

Jamaica Festival Song History: 1978 – Watch Eric Donaldson with “Land of my Birth”

Jamaica Festival Song winner for 1978 - Eric Donaldson with "Land of my Birth" Lyrics from: http://www.wowlyrics.com Ooh, Ooh, Ooh, Ooh, Ooh, Aah, Aah, Aah This is the land of my birth; I say this is the land of my birth. I say this is Jamaica, my Jamaica, the land of my birth. I will never … Continue reading Jamaica Festival Song History: 1978 – Watch Eric Donaldson with “Land of my Birth”