Tessanne Chin on NBC The Voice

Hilarious Jamaican review of ALL Tessanne Chin’s performances on NBC The Voice

By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2013, Denise N. Fyffe The highlight of my day came when I came across an hilarious video review on Youtube from The Dutty Berry Show on Why #Tessanne Chin Had Many Rivers To Cross. This certainly has led to many minutes spent on YouTube scoping out each weekly review … Continue reading Hilarious Jamaican review of ALL Tessanne Chin’s performances on NBC The Voice

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Bob Marley: The Shooting of a Wailer by Cameron Crowe, January 13, 1977

Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known Jamaican Reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house…

Midnight Raver

Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house. Another man, described by one observer as looking like “a…

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Leroy Smart – Sugar My Coffee

Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Leroy Smart

I was introduced to Leroy Smart about 20 years ago by my then room mate Rich, aka Prime Mundo. He had a stash of really good Jamaican pressed LPs in his closet, one of them was a Leroy Smart record. He told me a story of going to see Leroy perform sometime in the 80′s with a mutual friend in West Philly. They were the only white boys in the joint, and when the lights went down, the patrons who were dressed to the nines, let the Collie flow. Now these guys were in tees and jeans, and afraid they would get caught lighting a joint in the place. Imagine? Relieved, I believe the smoked said joint and that the Leroy Smart show was one of the best Reggae shows he has seen live. If not for the atmosphere, but for Smart’s music and presence as well. Here’s something I dug up a while ago on the cheap. It’s Leroy Smart with “Sugar My Coffee” from his 1979 Lp Let Everyman Survive on G.G.’s/ Hit Records.

Flea Market Funk

I was introduced to Leroy Smart about 20 years ago by my then room mate Rich, aka Prime Mundo. He had a stash of really good Jamaican pressed LPs in his closet, one of them was a Leroy Smart record. He told me a story of going to see Leroy perform sometime in the 80’s with a mutual friend in West Philly. They were the only white boys in the joint, and when the lights went down, the patrons who were dressed to the nines, let the Collie flow. Now these guys were in tees and jeans, and afraid they would get caught lighting a joint in the place. Imagine? Relieved, I believe the smoked said joint and that the Leroy Smart show was one of the best Reggae shows he has seen live. If not for the atmosphere, but for Smart’s music and presence as well. Here’s something I…

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The greatest show on earth

The internationally acclaimed Sumfest happened last weekend, right here in lil ol’ Mobay. We had Trey ladies-keep-your-panties-on Songz and Damian sexiest-rasta-alive Marley headlining the two international nights, though I hear Shabba Ranks stole the show on Friday night. Not that I’m entirely certain who Shabba Ranks is. . .

Reggae Sumfest has origins way back before I was a twinkle in my mother’s eye when it started out as Reggae

I Need a Girl (Trey Songz song)

Sunsplash, an annual festival of Jamaican music that everyone in my parents’ generation likes to bring up as their version of “back when music was actually good”. But my point is that Sumfest has been around for a while, and judging by the consistently insane crowds it draws, it will probably be around for a while longer. Which is a good thing, because I have never been to Sumfest.

It’s kind of sad, really. It happens almost literally in my backyard every year, and every year it comes, I wave, and it passes on its merry, memorable way. It’s a quintessential Jamaican, nay, Montegonian experience that I have yet to acquire. That is a travesty. At first I was too young to go to Sumfest and then as I grew older, I grew less interested in the artistes that were actually showing up. I mean, you wouldn’t catch me dead at Dancehall Night (no offense, but there’s no way I’m paying almost $8000 just to bend over and back it up). And there was this whole phase where I swore off concerts unless a rock band was involved. I’m serious; I joined the Facebook group to prove it.

As Raw As Ever

So Sumfest continues to be marketed as the greatest show on earth, with that iconic symbol of a dancing Rasta (that may or may not be Robert Nesta) pushing its brand beyond local borders. It’s one in a long list of things that keep Jamaica being the leading Caribbean destination (sorry, other touristy islands) and keep Montego Bay being one seriously awesome second city. So what if I haven’t been to Sumfest once in the twenty years I’ve been alive? Maybe I’ll go the year they finally get Fall Out Boy as headliners.

Pax.

Well Read Robin

The internationally acclaimed Sumfest happened last weekend, right here in lil ol’ Mobay. We had Trey ladies-keep-your-panties-on Songz and Damian sexiest-rasta-alive Marley headlining the two international nights, though I hear Shabba Ranks stole the show on Friday night. Not that I’m entirely certain who Shabba Ranks is. . .

Reggae Sumfest has origins way back before I was a twinkle in my mother’s eye when it started out as Reggae Sunsplash, an annual festival of Jamaican music that everyone in my parents’ generation likes to bring up as their version of “back when music was actually good”. But my point is that Sumfest has been around for a while, and judging by the consistently insane crowds it draws, it will probably be around for a while longer. Which is a good thing, because I have never been to Sumfest.

It’s kind of sad, really. It happens almost literally in…

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Dancehall: The Story of Jamaican Dancehall Culture By Beth Lesser (my review)

How many of us have ever seen photos of artists like Nicodemus, Josie Wales, Yami Bolo, Papa San, Peter Metro, Lone Ranger, Coco Tea, Sister Nancy etc in the prime? The photos are iconic.

I have bought this book many a times to give as presents to friends when on travels to Jamaica and Canada and the recipients all have loved it.

Even now at my house in Old Harbour all my friends want to buy my own copy. No chance!

Every library in Jamaica should have a copy. These artistes in the photos did not have much if any airplay on radio in Jamaica at the time which has meant that reggae fans overseas have more appreciation for the excellent output that made Jamaica well known and respect in countries as further afield as Poland and Japan. So the younger generation have no idea who these artistes were but if they saw these photos the kids could be inspired to dig further.

Be warned – its a very weighty book but important addition to gaining understanding to Jamaican music……

On a slightly side issue……

When you travel around Jamaica you will see new streets and places named after famous athletes, politicians etc. Even in Portmore you see areas called Sandown, Kempton and Aintree which are racecourses in the UK. What’s that about?

But given Jamaica’s greatest consistent global (& respected )export – has been our music – how many of our artistes have ever been publicly acknowledged in some way for their contribution? On the kind of scale like some of our athletes or politicians?

I would love to see a Jackie Mittoo Centre of Music, Jacob Miller Avenue, Delroy Wilson Park, Mighty Diamond Housing Scheme. These people have done wonders in their short but inspiring lives and revered worldwide.

Lets give them the public respect they richly deserve.

wingswithme

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0955481716/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

Without a doubt one of the most important books ever published about the history of post independent Jamaican music. Great for the coffee table or the verandah! A copy of this book would be a great educational reference for young Jamaicans especially who have no clue as to that pivotal era in music.

The photos capture a wonderful period in Jamaican music. As for the poses you just going to LOL when you see them.

How many of us have ever seen photos of artists like Nicodemus, Josie Wales, Yami Bolo, Papa San, Peter Metro, Lone Ranger, Coco Tea, Sister Nancy etc in the prime? The photos are iconic.

I have bought this book many a times to give as presents to friends when on travels to Jamaica and Canada and the recipients all have loved it.

Even now at my house in Old Harbour all my friends want…

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the skatalites

The History and Influence of Jamaican Music

This is an old but interesting article from 2012 on the trajectory of Jamaican music, starting with mento and ska, then the reggae greats, and finally their influence on modern rhythms, such as dancehall, reggaeton, trip-hop, and dubstep.

[It is] impossible to quantify the remarkable impact the island has had on global culture, thanks in large part to a legacy of musical innovation stretching back over 50 years. Without Jamaica, the world would never have known the sounds of ska, reggae or even hip-hop, all of which were born on this tiny island in the West Indies.

THE ROOTS: Though most people associate the island with the laid-back rhythms of reggae, Jamaica’s first major musical movement was the more uptempo sound of ska. Combining elements of Caribbean mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm & blues, ska arose in the wake of American soldiers stationed in Jamaica during and after World War II, and its celebratory sound coincided with Jamaica’s independence from the UK in 1962. Early acts such as The Skatalites and The Wailers remain legends today, influencing ‘80s acts such as Madness, The Specials and English Beat and ‘90s icons such as Sublime, No Doubt and the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. But by the late ‘60s, as American soul music was becoming slower and smoother, ska began to evolve into reggae, whose central themes of peace, love, justice and equality mirrored the ideals of the American counter-cultural movement of the same era.

THE HEART: The dawn of reggae found Jamaican music spreading throughout the world, with Bob Marley & the Wailers leading the charge. With lyrics that balanced sociopolitical discourse, religious themes and messages of love and positivity, songs such as “Get Up, Stand Up” and “I Shot the Sheriff” made them international superstars (particularly after the latter was covered by Eric Clapton in 1974). But they weren’t the only Jamaican artists to break out: Acts such as ex-Wailer Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Burning Spear, Black Uhuru and Culture all emerged as stars on the global stage. Wailers producer Lee “Scratch” Perry was chosen to work with British punk legends The Clash, while British bands such as The Police and Steel Pulse proved reggae’s influence was spreading far beyond Jamaica’s borders. In 1985, the Grammy Awards introduced a Best Reggae Album category, signaling the Jamaican sound’s firm place in the mainstream….

THE BRANCHES: While the influence of ska and reggae cannot be overstated, it was another Jamaican music sub-genre that ultimately changed the world. Popularized by production wizards such as Lee “Scratch” Perry and Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Burning Spear, Black Uhuru and Culture is a largely instrumental version of reggae originally used to test sound systems. To hype the crowds at the parties and nightclubs where the DJs performed, they would get on the microphone and “toast” in hip rhyming patterns. When Kingston native Clive “DJ Kool Herc” Campbell moved to the Bronx, his legendary parties gave birth to the sound now known as hip-hop, influencing practically every DJ and MC that followed. In recent years a bevy of popular musical forms have evolved out of Jamaican styles, including dancehall, reggaeton and trip-hop. Whether it’s Bob’s son Ziggy Marley singing the theme song to the children’s TV show Arthur, pop star Sean Kingston or the techno hybrid known as dubstep, these days Jamaican music is everywhere, ensuring the little island will continue to be a big influence for many years to come.

Read more at The History and Influence of Jamaican Music

Repeating Islands

theskatalites

This is an old but interesting article from 2012 on the trajectory of Jamaican music, starting with mento and ska, then the reggae greats, and finally their influence on modern rhythms, such as dancehall, reggaeton, trip-hop, and dubstep. Here are excerpts from Bret Love’s assessment of the influence of Jamaican music.

[It is] impossible to quantify the remarkable impact the island has had on global culture, thanks in large part to a legacy of musical innovation stretching back over 50 years. Without Jamaica, the world would never have known the sounds of ska, reggae or even hip-hop, all of which were born on this tiny island in the West Indies.

THE ROOTS: Though most people associate the island with the laid-back rhythms of reggae, Jamaica’s first major musical movement was the more uptempo sound of ska. Combining elements of Caribbean mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm & blues, ska arose in the wake…

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Jamaican Reggae Music: An Ode to Bob Marley (List of all Bob Marley’s Albums)

By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2012, Poetess Defy, Denise Fyffe The name Jamaica is synonymous with Bob Marley, and vice versa. Jamaican Reggae Music is at the stage it is today because of this man and his efforts. Even today his album's are successful and new compilations are released by the Marley family, regularly. … Continue reading Jamaican Reggae Music: An Ode to Bob Marley (List of all Bob Marley’s Albums)

Jamaican Music: Nomaddz – Rise above profanity

I’ve spent a chilled evening listening to these guys and am a big fan. Nomaddz are a group of former Kingston College students who started out in 2000 to take Jamaica by storm with their own brand of Dub Poetry. Described as the front runners of the new Reggae revival movement, their song ‘sort out yuh life Jamaica’ was officially used to commemorate Jamaica’s 50th anniversary of independence in 2012. Great for both chilling to and also getting your groove on, this video if them performing ‘rise above profanity’ at the Bob Marley Museum is one of my faves.

 

Barry's Elective

I’ve spent a chilled evening listening to these guys and am a big fan. Nomaddz are a group of former Kingston College students who started out in 2000 to take Jamaica by storm with their own brand of Dub Poetry. Described as the front runners of the new Reggae revival movement, their song ‘sort out yuh life Jamaica’ was officially used to commemorate Jamaica’s 50th anniversary of independence in 2012. Great for both chilling to and also getting your groove on, this video if them performing ‘rise above profanity’ at the Bob Marley Museum is one of my faves.

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Reneto Adams Calls For 50 Year Sentence For Vybz Kartel

Notorious ex-police officer Reneto Adams is calling for a hefty sentence for convicted dancehall star Vybz Kartel. Vybz Kartel and three of his four co-accused are facing 25 years to life imprisonment for the murder of Clive “Lizard” Williams.

The accused men was found guilty by a 10:1 jury last week Thursday in the Home Circuit court in Kingston.

Speaking with the Observer, Reneto Adams expressed his delight in the conviction and called for a 50-year sentence to be handed down on the self proclaim Worl’Boss.

“I have been one of the voices crying out in the wilderness for criminals to be found guilty and locked up for no less than 50 years for heinous crimes,” Adams said.

“The Jamaican people have suffered for far too long,” Reneto Adams added.

Reneto Adams also blast some members of the police force for the way they handle some of the evidence against the accused men.

Vybz Kartel, whose real name is Adidja Palmer, Shawn “Storm” Campbell, André St John, and Kahira Jones were all found guilty of Lizard’s murder. Shane Williams was acquitted for same murder charge.

The four convicted men will be sentenced in court next week Tuesday.

Real Big Faces

Vybz Real Big Faces

Notorious ex-police officer Reneto Adams is calling for a hefty sentence for convicted dancehall star Vybz Kartel.

Vybz Kartel and three of his four co-accused are facing 25 years to life imprisonment for the murder of Clive “Lizard” Williams.

The accused men was found guilty by a 10:1 jury last week Thursday in the Home Circuit court in Kingston.

Speaking with the Observer, Reneto Adams expressed his delight in the conviction and called for a 50-year sentence to be handed down on the self proclaim Worl’Boss.

“I have been one of the voices crying out in the wilderness for criminals to be found guilty and locked up for no less than 50 years for heinous crimes,” Adams said.

“The Jamaican people have suffered for far too long,” Adams added.

Reneto Adams also blast some members of the police force for the way they handle some of the evidence against the accused men.

Vybz Kartel, whose real name is Adidja Palmer…

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Vybz Kartel’s trials and tribulations

Vybz Kartel’s sentencing was supposed to take place yesterday but has been postponed to April 3. The Dept of Correctional Services is to decide whether Kartel will be allowed to record music in prison, and if allowed, whether proceeds should go to the family of the victim Clive ‘Lizard’ Williams.

Active Voice

Kartel holding kerchief to face as he enters courtroom for sentencing on March 27, 2014. Jermaine Barnaby/Photographer

Vybz Kartel’s sentencing was supposed to take place yesterday but has been postponed to April 3. The Dept of Correctional Services is to decide whether Kartel will be allowed to record music in prison, and if allowed, whether proceeds should go to the family of the victim Clive ‘Lizard’ Williams.

According to a report in the Jamaica Observer:

Justice Campbell postponed the sentencing after defence lawyers informed him that they had not received a letter he instructed the Supreme Court to draft and send to the prosecution and the defence.

Director of Public Prosecutions Paula Llewellyn admitted receiving the correspondence.

Justice Campbell told the court that he wanted the assistance of both sides on sentencing guidelines.

He said the degree of participation of each convicted man in the murder would be important…

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A Death by Skin Cancer? The Bob Marley Story

Dr Cleland Gooding MD., F.A.A.D., a physician with a specialty in Skin Diseases employed by the Bahamas Government, has penned this intriguing article about Bob Marley’s failed treatment for skin cancer, which eventually progressed to the brain cancer responsible for his death at 36. Here are excerpts, with a link to the original article below.

Bob Marley the charismatic beloved Jamaican singer, who introduced Reggae infused with Rastafarian themes died from a cancerous brain Tumor on May 11, 1981 in Miami. Florida. He was only 36 years old.

It’s been 30 years since his death; and there have many rumours and speculation about the cause of death. Did he really die from a brain tumor? Or other nefarious causes? Like the CIA? Poison in his boots etc? Bob Marley’s medical records were never made public. However from several sources I managed to piece together the story of his illness and death from Metastatic Skin cancer (Melanoma). This account I hope is fair, balanced and enlightening.

Bob Marley remains the most widely known and revered performer of reggae music and is credited with spreading Jamaican and the Rastafarian movement worldwide.

When was the first indication that something was amiss with Bob Marley’s health? According to sources this first happened in the summer of 1977. He injured his right great toe during a Soccer game on tour in Paris, France. The toe nail became partially detached and painful. He admitted to his manager that the toe had been injured before and a wound was “on and off” for years! If that was true, could a malignant melanoma (skin cancer) been growing there earlier? A wound or sore that refuses to heal is a classic sign of skin cancer.

The hotel doctor was consulted and the right great toe nail was removed and the toe bandaged. No biopsy was done. The European tour continued and the Right great toe appeared to heal. However, later that summer he hurt the toe again playing soccer. It was painful and a new wound opened up and refused to heal. As Bob Marley went to London for a meeting, late that summer (1977), his manager advised him to see a doctor. According to reports the appearance of his toe shocked the Doctor. It was said to be “eating away”. A skin biopsy was done (removal of skin tissue for examination under the microscope).

The shocking diagnosis of a malignant melanoma (Skin cancer) was given to Bob Marley. He was advised that treatment would be to amputate the toe, to stop the cancer from spreading.

In Miami still in the summer 1977, the British diagnosis of malignant melanoma was confirmed to Bob Marley again. He was advised to get the toe amputated and possibly the right foot. Again he refused.

Why didn’t Bob Marley have the amputation? He cited religious beliefs about “not cutting the flesh”. However he allowed the famous orthopedic surgeon Dr William Bacon to do a surgical excision to “cut away” cancerous tissue on the toe and do a skin graft at Cedar’s of Lebanon Hospital (now University of Miami Hospital). He remained in Hospital one week and spent about three months recuperating in Miami. The procedure was deemed “a success”. But sadly it was not. The cancer in it virulent form began to spread through his body (metastasized).

This brings the question, why would Bob Marley get skin cancer on his toe? First we must remember that Bob was diagnosed with an Acral Melanoma. This type accounts for 70 per cent of melanoma in darkly pigmented individual or Asians. It typically occurs on non-sun exposed areas as the palm, the sole and mucosa and under the nails. It is characterised by a dark mole or spot that can turn cancerous.

This can happen by repeated trauma to the area or for no reason at all. Studies have shown that darker skin people are more likely to present with advanced disease stage III -IV than whites who typically appear with stage I. This is exactly what happened in Mr. Marley’s case. He presented with a skin cancer stage 3-4 on his toe.

He also was fair-skinned of a white father. Being fair-skinned is a risk factor for skin cancer. Melanoma can take years to spread. Most likely he had a pigmented dark mole under his right great toe nail, the continued playing of soccer traumatized the dark mole, which turned cancerous then into a sore. When his cancer was discovered (summer of 1977) the recommendation to amputate his toe would most certainly have saved his life. The surgical excision done and the skin graft (July 1977) was ineffective or simply too late.

As the years went by, his health was deteriorating. He continued to be immersed in his music. In 1976 there was an attempt on his life in Jamaica, Mr. Marley narrowly escaped death, He, his wife and manager Don Taylor were shot.

Among the Doctors attending, them was a prominent Bahamian doctor Dr. Philip Thompson who was attending U.W.I. at the time.

In 1979, Bob Marley visited Nassau, The trip was opposed by some religious ministers.

It does not appear that he followed up on his doctor’s visits.

All appeared well until 1980. He released his last album “Uprising” and the band, the Wailers were planning an American tour with Stevie Wonder for the winter of 1980. However by the summer of 1980 the cancer was metastasizing through his body. According to sources, he did not feel well and saw a doctor who give him clearance to go on tour!

The tour started in Boston followed by New York in September 1980. During the show in New York in Madison Square Gardens Bob looked sick and almost fainted. The very next morning September 21 while jogging through Central Park Bob Marley collapsed and was brought to a hospital. Tests showed a brain tumor, which most likely had spread from the primary cancer on his right great toe. The cancer was now spreading to his vital organs.

How does a malignant melanoma spread? It is generally agreed that melanoma cells spread via the lymphatic, the blood stream or both. Then it can affect the liver, the lungs, the brain or the bones.

A neurologist gave him one month to live. Rita Marley is said to have wanted the remaining tour cancelled, but Bob wanted to continue. He played his last show in Pittsburgh, but was too ill to continue and the tour was finally cancelled. That show proved to be his last.

Convinced at last to seek medical treatment, Bob was admitted to Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan NY. This center is one of the world’s leading cancer treatment center. Tests then revealed the malignant melanoma cancer had spread to his lungs and liver. He received a few radiation treatments, but checked out when some New York papers let on that he was seriously ill. He went to Miami, then back to Sloan-Kettering, then Jamaica. Why the back and forth? Some said he hadn’t much faith in “Western Medicine”.

He was advised to seek further help in Germany. Bob and his entourage then travelled to Germany to the Bavarian Clinic of Dr Josef Issels. He was a specialist in Holistics, or Toxic cancer treatment. Why leave a world renowned cancer treatment center like Sloan-Kettering to go to a holistic center? That is a mystery to me.

While in Germany Bob Marley celebrated his 36th and final birthday. While at the center in Germany Bob Marley received such treatments as exercise, ozone injections, vitamins and trace elements. However, as the months went by, he realized that these treatments were not working and his cancer was terminal.

TREATMENT

What is the treatment for Advanced Malignant Melanoma ?

 

Repeating Islands

Dr Cleland Gooding MD., F.A.A.D., a physician with a specialty in Skin Diseases employed by the Bahamas Government, has penned this intriguing article about Bob Marley’s failed treatment for skin cancer, which eventually progressed to the brain cancer responsible for his death at 36. Here are excerpts, with a link to the original article below.

Bob Marley the charismatic beloved Jamaican singer, who introduced reggae infused with Rastafarian themes died from a cancerous brain Tumor on May 11, 1981 in Miami. Florida. He was only 36 years old.

It’s been 30 years since his death; and there have many rumours and speculation about the cause of death. Did he really die from a brain tumor? Or other nefarious causes? Like the CIA? Poison in his boots etc? Bob Marley’s medical records were never made public. However from several sources I managed to piece together the story of his illness and…

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Inner Circle Headlines Jamaica50 Celebration NY Central Park Summer Stage w/ Israel Vibrations & The Mighty Diamonds

To anyone who’s familiar with Inner Circle, the GRAMMY® winning band’s 20-year-plus history in reggae has had a long string of successes. Inner Circle’s special brand of pop-oriented Jamaican beats and energy-filled live performances have allowed the band to transcend the traditional reggae niche and enjoy widespread crossover appeal.

Jamaica Festival Song History: 1977 – Watch Eric Donaldson with “Sweet Jamaica”

Jamaica Festival Song winner for 1977 - Eric Donaldson with "Sweet Jamaica" Lyrics from: http://www.wowlyrics.com Sweet Jamaica is now on the move. Help me with my song and let the people dem come sing along. Tek up yu cutlass, yu shovel and yu hoe. Tek up yu boots dem, people let us go. Call out the … Continue reading Jamaica Festival Song History: 1977 – Watch Eric Donaldson with “Sweet Jamaica”

Jamaica Festival Song History: 1978 – Watch Eric Donaldson with “Land of my Birth”

Jamaica Festival Song winner for 1978 - Eric Donaldson with "Land of my Birth" Lyrics from: http://www.wowlyrics.com Ooh, Ooh, Ooh, Ooh, Ooh, Aah, Aah, Aah This is the land of my birth; I say this is the land of my birth. I say this is Jamaica, my Jamaica, the land of my birth. I will never … Continue reading Jamaica Festival Song History: 1978 – Watch Eric Donaldson with “Land of my Birth”

Tobago Jazz Experience 2014

The Tobago Jazz Experience 2014

From April 19 to 27, 2014, Tobago will be celebrating the Tobago Jazz Experience at different venues, including Speyside, Signal Hill, Scarborough, Castara, and the Pigeon Point Heritage Park. Performers will include Tessanne Chin; Tarrus Riley; John Legend; Earth, Wind and Fire; Chryssee; Brandy; Keyshia Cole; and R’Kardo St’von. See links below for more information.

Repeating Islands

Tobago Jazz Experience 2014

From April 19 to 27, 2014, Tobago will be celebrating the Tobago Jazz Experience at different venues, including Speyside, Signal Hill, Scarborough, Castara, and the Pigeon Point Heritage Park. Performers will include Tessanne Chin; Tarrus Riley; John Legend; Earth, Wind and Fire; Chryssee; Brandy; Keyshia Cole; and R’Kardo St’von. See links below for more information.

Description: The Tobago Jazz Experience (TJE) 2014 is a celebration of jazz, along with the indigenous music of Trinidad and Tobago and the Caribbean. Staying true to its promise of offering “much more than music” however, the Tobago Jazz Experience incorporates the cultural and historical practices that define the island of Tobago as an ideal destination.

Visitors can indulge in the gastronomic experience that is the authentic dirt oven bread indigenous to the village of Castara; take a walk off the beaten path into the Main Ridge Reserve; immerse themselves in cultural treats such as…

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Vybz Kartel Lost A Lot Of Weight Since Guilty Verdict [PHOTO]

A guilty verdict and a possible life sentence would make anyone loose weight and that’s just what happened to Vybz Kartel.Prior and during the trial, Vybz Kartel packed on a lot of pounds and looked like someone who was eating well behind bars. The above photo was taken moments ago showing the deejay and his co-accused Kahira Jones heading into the Supreme Court building in Downtown Kingston.

The “Cake Soap” deejay looked thin and frail as he faced the judge for a final time to know how long he will be in prison.

Vybz-Kartel-leaving-court

Metrocaribbean.com Blog

Vybz-Kartel-and-Kahira-Jones

A guilty verdict and a possible life sentence would make anyone loose weight and that’s just what happened to Vybz Kartel.Prior and during the trial, Vybz Kartel packed on a lot of pounds and looked like someone who was eating well behind bars. The above photo was taken moments ago showing the deejay and his co-accused Kahira Jones heading into the Supreme Court building in

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