Jamaican Lifestyle: The Pros and Cons of being a mystery shopper

For someone who loves to shop or investigate the services of merchandise business; then the job of a mystery shopper will be appealing. This particular assignment allows a shopper to evaluate the products and services offered by any company. This opportunity has grown over the years due to the accessibility of the internet to millions … Continue reading Jamaican Lifestyle: The Pros and Cons of being a mystery shopper

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Jamaican Lifestyle: Transitioning from Beauty magazines to beauty blogs

Can you remember when you were younger walking into stores and scanning through all the beauty magazines? Did you used to have a stash of beauty magazines in your room? This is a common practice among women. It is almost an essential item in our own private stash; that of having a beauty magazine tucked … Continue reading Jamaican Lifestyle: Transitioning from Beauty magazines to beauty blogs

Jamaican Poetry: Muse (You are) by Denise N. Fyffe

You are the red bull to my system
The diesel to my engine
Thinking of you makes me want to give up religion
Looking into your intriguing brown eyes
Makes me want to jump that window//
And sit on your thighs;

Denise N. Fyffe

By: Denise N. Fyffe.
Copyright © 2015, Denise N. Fyffe

You are the red bull to my system
The diesel to my engine
Thinking of you makes me want to give up religion
Looking into your intriguing brown eyes
Makes me want to jump that window//
And sit on your thighs;

You are the larva in my volcano
The blues to my jazz
You make me want to embrace being Jamaican
And galang bad bad;
Tasting you, intoxicates me, leaving me drunk
Making me want to get a DUI, and give you some prison funk;

You are the milk to my cookie
Like sex on the beach
No matter the sand,
Let it flow wherever it gains entry;
Crippled with emotion, as you caress my thighs
Thinking when I go home, to my man I won’t apologize.

You are my muse, the king on my throne
You make me…

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Jamaican Poetry: I want to find the one

I want to find the one
That is worthy of me,
Will let me be the butterfly and hawk,
Coexisting in this one body;
I wanna let them be
Let them feel safe to be,
A lion, a beetle, to simply be free
But to take me along Not just for me
But because, they cannot be Without me;

Denise N. Fyffe

By: Denise defy Fyffe.
Copyright © 2012, Poetess Defy, Denise N. Fyffe

I want to find the one
That I will love
That I will cherish
That will love only me;
I wanna acknowledge their presence and make them and me
Be one,
I wanna give that one
The idea, the knowledge, the fact
That we are one,
That they, are my only one;

I want to find the one
That is worthy of me,
Will let me be the butterfly and hawk,
Coexisting in this one body;
I wanna let them be
Let them feel safe to be,
A lion, a beetle, to simply be free
But to take me along Not just for me
But because, they cannot be Without me;

I wanna find the one that I will love
Completely, freely and sincerely;
I want that one to find me
Before I accept defeat of never finding…

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Jamaican Poetry: Books by Poetess Denise N. Fyffe

Check out and Purchase Books by Poetess Denise N. Fyffe Sensuous One By Denise N. Fyffe eBook (ePub): $5.99 Paperback: $12.99      Sensual poetic expressions about romance, love and infatuation _______________________________________________________________ Jamaican Pebbles: Poetry Pocketbook By Denise N. Fyffe Paperback: $28.50      Poetic expressions and gems of wisdom about life, love and social issues. PURCHASE HERE _______________________________________________________________   More Detail Jamaican … Continue reading Jamaican Poetry: Books by Poetess Denise N. Fyffe

What Jamaican Writers need to know about their rights and Jamcopy

By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2013, Denise N. Fyffe If you are a Jamaican writer and you do not know about Jamcopy, then you are at a serious disadvantage. Jamcopy is the organization which looks out for the interest of every registered Jamaican writer. They have been climbing to new heights and achieving their … Continue reading What Jamaican Writers need to know about their rights and Jamcopy

Jamaican Lifestyle: Shopping online for affordable/cheap shoes

By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2012, Poetess Defy, Denise N. Fyffe Convenience is one of the main reasons to shop online. You will never find a better method to fulfill this requirement. You never have to leave your home to go anywhere, or spend on gas, transportation or any other miscellaneous item. When you … Continue reading Jamaican Lifestyle: Shopping online for affordable/cheap shoes

Why Silence Can be More Powerful than Words with a Man

woman 2THE PROBLEM
Today, women often expect men to act like women – our culture has taught us to do this, and we don’t even question it. We expect men to be just like us – to think like us, to process emotions like us, to need to talk about their feelings like we do, to love words and emotional “connection” like we do, to want to sit face to face and talk for hours. We expect them to be like our close girlfriends.

quotes about anger

Here’s some surprising news! Men aren’t like women. God made us to be very different. It’s good that we are different from each other. But we get ourselves into a lot of trouble when we assume that men think, process and feel like we do and that when they say or do things it would mean the same thing that we would mean if we did that thing. Did that make sense?

There are some similarities, of course. But there are many differences – and if we don’t understand those differences, we end up speaking a foreign language to men. We misunderstand them and they misunderstand us. That is frustrating! Our relationships work MUCH better when we understand men, allow them to be masculine and admire them for being masculine. The differences are what make relationships between men and women so magnetic!

Peaceful Single Girl

Ladies,

As women, we LOVE words.  Marriage counselor and author, Bob Grant, likes to say, “Words are for women.”  We usually like to emote, talk, share, chat, email, text, talk on the phone and relate.  That’s how we “connect” and feel close and loved with each other and with everyone in our lives. 

The opposite of Bob Grant’s statement is also true – but most of us don’t realize it. 

Words are not for men. 

Men use words, of course.  But words don’t have the same impact, meaning and power over men that they do for women emotionally – usually.

If you are ever in doubt about a man’s true feelings, trust his ACTIONS over his words.  Ideally, they would both match up.  But if they don’t match – his actions will tell you what he really thinks and feels.

WHY THE DIFFERENCES? (For those of you who are interested…

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Jamaican Relationships: Women Here Are 37 Things That Can Mess up Your Sex Life

Ugh. It’s happened. The husband and I have turned into a married people cliché with sex having to be scheduled like it’s a doctor’s visit. With two kids and two careers there’s little time, or energy, left in the day; it’s just the way it’s got to be. If you were to ask my husband about … Continue reading Jamaican Relationships: Women Here Are 37 Things That Can Mess up Your Sex Life

Jamaican Relationships: Relationships and Respect

Respect is as important as love, in a relationship; upon which all our actions are based. The foundation will begin to crumble and destroy the entire structure of any relation if respect is absent. Hurt feelings will fester and sooner or later the disrespected party, will make their feelings known. Respect in a Jamaican relationship … Continue reading Jamaican Relationships: Relationships and Respect

Jamaican Beach Wedding – How to plan a wedding on the beach

  By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2012, Poetess Defy, Denise Fyffe The idea of having a Jamaican wedding on the beach is extremely romantic. Both concepts alone are examples of romance and love; therefore to combine both things should make for a very memorable and special affair. Do you have a beautiful Jamaican beach … Continue reading Jamaican Beach Wedding – How to plan a wedding on the beach

Bob Marley: The Shooting of a Wailer by Cameron Crowe, January 13, 1977

Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known Jamaican Reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house…

Midnight Raver

Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house. Another man, described by one observer as looking like “a…

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Leroy Smart – Sugar My Coffee

Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Leroy Smart

I was introduced to Leroy Smart about 20 years ago by my then room mate Rich, aka Prime Mundo. He had a stash of really good Jamaican pressed LPs in his closet, one of them was a Leroy Smart record. He told me a story of going to see Leroy perform sometime in the 80′s with a mutual friend in West Philly. They were the only white boys in the joint, and when the lights went down, the patrons who were dressed to the nines, let the Collie flow. Now these guys were in tees and jeans, and afraid they would get caught lighting a joint in the place. Imagine? Relieved, I believe the smoked said joint and that the Leroy Smart show was one of the best Reggae shows he has seen live. If not for the atmosphere, but for Smart’s music and presence as well. Here’s something I dug up a while ago on the cheap. It’s Leroy Smart with “Sugar My Coffee” from his 1979 Lp Let Everyman Survive on G.G.’s/ Hit Records.

Flea Market Funk

I was introduced to Leroy Smart about 20 years ago by my then room mate Rich, aka Prime Mundo. He had a stash of really good Jamaican pressed LPs in his closet, one of them was a Leroy Smart record. He told me a story of going to see Leroy perform sometime in the 80’s with a mutual friend in West Philly. They were the only white boys in the joint, and when the lights went down, the patrons who were dressed to the nines, let the Collie flow. Now these guys were in tees and jeans, and afraid they would get caught lighting a joint in the place. Imagine? Relieved, I believe the smoked said joint and that the Leroy Smart show was one of the best Reggae shows he has seen live. If not for the atmosphere, but for Smart’s music and presence as well. Here’s something I…

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The greatest show on earth

The internationally acclaimed Sumfest happened last weekend, right here in lil ol’ Mobay. We had Trey ladies-keep-your-panties-on Songz and Damian sexiest-rasta-alive Marley headlining the two international nights, though I hear Shabba Ranks stole the show on Friday night. Not that I’m entirely certain who Shabba Ranks is. . .

Reggae Sumfest has origins way back before I was a twinkle in my mother’s eye when it started out as Reggae

I Need a Girl (Trey Songz song)

Sunsplash, an annual festival of Jamaican music that everyone in my parents’ generation likes to bring up as their version of “back when music was actually good”. But my point is that Sumfest has been around for a while, and judging by the consistently insane crowds it draws, it will probably be around for a while longer. Which is a good thing, because I have never been to Sumfest.

It’s kind of sad, really. It happens almost literally in my backyard every year, and every year it comes, I wave, and it passes on its merry, memorable way. It’s a quintessential Jamaican, nay, Montegonian experience that I have yet to acquire. That is a travesty. At first I was too young to go to Sumfest and then as I grew older, I grew less interested in the artistes that were actually showing up. I mean, you wouldn’t catch me dead at Dancehall Night (no offense, but there’s no way I’m paying almost $8000 just to bend over and back it up). And there was this whole phase where I swore off concerts unless a rock band was involved. I’m serious; I joined the Facebook group to prove it.

As Raw As Ever

So Sumfest continues to be marketed as the greatest show on earth, with that iconic symbol of a dancing Rasta (that may or may not be Robert Nesta) pushing its brand beyond local borders. It’s one in a long list of things that keep Jamaica being the leading Caribbean destination (sorry, other touristy islands) and keep Montego Bay being one seriously awesome second city. So what if I haven’t been to Sumfest once in the twenty years I’ve been alive? Maybe I’ll go the year they finally get Fall Out Boy as headliners.

Pax.

Well Read Robin

The internationally acclaimed Sumfest happened last weekend, right here in lil ol’ Mobay. We had Trey ladies-keep-your-panties-on Songz and Damian sexiest-rasta-alive Marley headlining the two international nights, though I hear Shabba Ranks stole the show on Friday night. Not that I’m entirely certain who Shabba Ranks is. . .

Reggae Sumfest has origins way back before I was a twinkle in my mother’s eye when it started out as Reggae Sunsplash, an annual festival of Jamaican music that everyone in my parents’ generation likes to bring up as their version of “back when music was actually good”. But my point is that Sumfest has been around for a while, and judging by the consistently insane crowds it draws, it will probably be around for a while longer. Which is a good thing, because I have never been to Sumfest.

It’s kind of sad, really. It happens almost literally in…

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