Jamaica Festival song 2015

Jamaica Festival Song, Looking Forward

Jamaica has a rich history, in various areas including sports, arts, culture, food etc. Surely not the least of these, is music. Jamaicans have thrived and are known to be some of the most easy going and happiest people in the world; simply, because they can ‘bill’ a vibe from listening to music. Jamaica, as … Continue reading Jamaica Festival Song, Looking Forward

the skatalites

The History and Influence of Jamaican Music

This is an old but interesting article from 2012 on the trajectory of Jamaican music, starting with mento and ska, then the reggae greats, and finally their influence on modern rhythms, such as dancehall, reggaeton, trip-hop, and dubstep.

[It is] impossible to quantify the remarkable impact the island has had on global culture, thanks in large part to a legacy of musical innovation stretching back over 50 years. Without Jamaica, the world would never have known the sounds of ska, reggae or even hip-hop, all of which were born on this tiny island in the West Indies.

THE ROOTS: Though most people associate the island with the laid-back rhythms of reggae, Jamaica’s first major musical movement was the more uptempo sound of ska. Combining elements of Caribbean mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm & blues, ska arose in the wake of American soldiers stationed in Jamaica during and after World War II, and its celebratory sound coincided with Jamaica’s independence from the UK in 1962. Early acts such as The Skatalites and The Wailers remain legends today, influencing ‘80s acts such as Madness, The Specials and English Beat and ‘90s icons such as Sublime, No Doubt and the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. But by the late ‘60s, as American soul music was becoming slower and smoother, ska began to evolve into reggae, whose central themes of peace, love, justice and equality mirrored the ideals of the American counter-cultural movement of the same era.

THE HEART: The dawn of reggae found Jamaican music spreading throughout the world, with Bob Marley & the Wailers leading the charge. With lyrics that balanced sociopolitical discourse, religious themes and messages of love and positivity, songs such as “Get Up, Stand Up” and “I Shot the Sheriff” made them international superstars (particularly after the latter was covered by Eric Clapton in 1974). But they weren’t the only Jamaican artists to break out: Acts such as ex-Wailer Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Burning Spear, Black Uhuru and Culture all emerged as stars on the global stage. Wailers producer Lee “Scratch” Perry was chosen to work with British punk legends The Clash, while British bands such as The Police and Steel Pulse proved reggae’s influence was spreading far beyond Jamaica’s borders. In 1985, the Grammy Awards introduced a Best Reggae Album category, signaling the Jamaican sound’s firm place in the mainstream….

THE BRANCHES: While the influence of ska and reggae cannot be overstated, it was another Jamaican music sub-genre that ultimately changed the world. Popularized by production wizards such as Lee “Scratch” Perry and Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Burning Spear, Black Uhuru and Culture is a largely instrumental version of reggae originally used to test sound systems. To hype the crowds at the parties and nightclubs where the DJs performed, they would get on the microphone and “toast” in hip rhyming patterns. When Kingston native Clive “DJ Kool Herc” Campbell moved to the Bronx, his legendary parties gave birth to the sound now known as hip-hop, influencing practically every DJ and MC that followed. In recent years a bevy of popular musical forms have evolved out of Jamaican styles, including dancehall, reggaeton and trip-hop. Whether it’s Bob’s son Ziggy Marley singing the theme song to the children’s TV show Arthur, pop star Sean Kingston or the techno hybrid known as dubstep, these days Jamaican music is everywhere, ensuring the little island will continue to be a big influence for many years to come.

Read more at The History and Influence of Jamaican Music

Repeating Islands

theskatalites

This is an old but interesting article from 2012 on the trajectory of Jamaican music, starting with mento and ska, then the reggae greats, and finally their influence on modern rhythms, such as dancehall, reggaeton, trip-hop, and dubstep. Here are excerpts from Bret Love’s assessment of the influence of Jamaican music.

[It is] impossible to quantify the remarkable impact the island has had on global culture, thanks in large part to a legacy of musical innovation stretching back over 50 years. Without Jamaica, the world would never have known the sounds of ska, reggae or even hip-hop, all of which were born on this tiny island in the West Indies.

THE ROOTS: Though most people associate the island with the laid-back rhythms of reggae, Jamaica’s first major musical movement was the more uptempo sound of ska. Combining elements of Caribbean mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm & blues, ska arose in the wake…

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A Death by Skin Cancer? The Bob Marley Story

Dr Cleland Gooding MD., F.A.A.D., a physician with a specialty in Skin Diseases employed by the Bahamas Government, has penned this intriguing article about Bob Marley’s failed treatment for skin cancer, which eventually progressed to the brain cancer responsible for his death at 36.

Here are excerpts, with a link to the original article below.

Bob Marley the charismatic beloved Jamaican singer, who introduced Reggae infused with Rastafarian themes died from a cancerous brain Tumor on May 11, 1981, in Miami. Florida.

He was only 36 years old.

It’s been 30 years since his death, and there have many rumors and speculation about the cause of death.

Did he really die from a brain tumor? Or other nefarious causes? Like the CIA? Poison in his boots etc?

Bob Marley’s medical records were never made public.

However, from several sources, I managed to piece together the story of his illness and death from Metastatic Skin cancer (Melanoma). This account I hope is fair, balanced and enlightening.

Bob Marley remains the most widely known and revered performer of reggae music and is credited with spreading Jamaican and the Rastafarian movement worldwide.

When was the first indication that something was amiss with Bob Marley’s health?

According to sources this first happened in the summer of 1977.

He injured his right great toe during a Soccer game on tour in Paris, France. The toe nail became partially detached and painful. He admitted to his manager that the toe had been injured before and a wound was “on and off” for years!

If that was true, could a malignant melanoma (skin cancer) been growing there earlier?

A wound or sore that refuses to heal is a classic sign of skin cancer.

The hotel doctor was consulted and the right great toe nail was removed and the toe bandaged.

No biopsy was done.

The European tour continued and the Right great toe appeared to heal. However, later that summer he hurt the toe again playing soccer. It was painful and a new wound opened up and refused to heal.

As Bob Marley went to London for a meeting, late that summer (1977), his manager advised him to see a doctor.

According to reports the appearance of his toe shocked the Doctor. It was said to be “eating away”. A skin biopsy was done (removal of skin tissue for examination under the microscope).

The shocking diagnosis of malignant melanoma (Skin cancer) was given to Bob Marley.

He was advised that treatment would be to amputate the toe, to stop the cancer from spreading.

In Miami still in the summer 1977, the British diagnosis of malignant melanoma was confirmed to Bob Marley again. He was advised to get the toe amputated and possibly the right foot.

Again he refused.

Why didn’t Bob Marley have the amputation?

He cited religious beliefs about “not cutting the flesh”.

However, he allowed the famous orthopedic surgeon Dr. William Bacon to do a surgical excision to “cut away” cancerous tissue on the toe and do a skin graft at Cedar’s of Lebanon Hospital (now University of Miami Hospital). He remained in Hospital one week and spent about three months recuperating in Miami.

The procedure was deemed “a success”. But sadly it was not. Cancer in its virulent form began to spread through his body (metastasized).

This brings the question, why would Bob Marley get skin cancer on his toe?

First, we must remember that Bob was diagnosed with an Acral Melanoma.

This type accounts for 70 percent of melanoma in darkly pigmented individual or Asians. It typically occurs on non-sun exposed areas as the palm, the sole and mucosa and under the nails. It is characterised by a dark mole or spot that can turn cancerous.

This can happen by repeated trauma to the area or for no reason at all.

Studies have shown that darker skin people are more likely to present with advanced disease stage III -IV than whites who typically appear with stage I. This is exactly what happened in Mr. Marley’s case.

He presented with a skin cancer stage 3-4 on his toe.

He also was fair-skinned of a white father. Being fair-skinned is a risk factor for skin cancer. Melanoma can take years to spread. Most likely he had a pigmented dark mole under his right great toe nail, the continued playing of soccer traumatized the dark mole, which turned cancerous then into a sore.

When his cancer was discovered (summer of 1977) the recommendation to amputate his toe would most certainly have saved his life. The surgical excision done and the skin graft (July 1977) was ineffective or simply too late.

As the years went by, his health was deteriorating. He continued to be immersed in his music. In 1976 there was an attempt on his life in Jamaica, Mr. Marley narrowly escaped death, He, his wife and manager Don Taylor were shot.

Among the Doctors attending, them was a prominent Bahamian doctor Dr. Philip Thompson who was attending U.W.I. at the time.

In 1979, Bob Marley visited Nassau, The trip was opposed by some religious ministers.

It does not appear that he followed up on his doctor’s visits.

All appeared well until 1980. He released his last album “Uprising” and the band, the Wailers were planning an American tour with Stevie Wonder for the winter of 1980.

However, by the summer of 1980, the cancer was metastasizing through his body. According to sources, he did not feel well and saw a doctor who gives him clearance to go on tour!

The tour started in Boston followed by New York in September 1980.

During the show in New York in Madison Square Gardens Bob looked sick and almost fainted.

The very next morning September 21 while jogging through Central Park Bob Marley collapsed and was brought to a hospital. Tests showed a brain tumor, which most likely had spread from primary cancer on his right great toe.

The cancer was now spreading to his vital organs.

How does a malignant melanoma spread?

It is generally agreed that melanoma cells spread via the lymphatic, the bloodstream or both. Then it can affect the liver, the lungs, the brain or the bones.

A neurologist gave him one month to live. Rita Marley is said to have wanted the remaining tour canceled, but Bob wanted to continue. He played his last show in Pittsburgh but was too ill to continue and the tour was finally canceled.

That show proved to be his last.

Convinced at last to seek medical treatment, Bob was admitted to Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan NY.

This center is one of the world’s leading cancer treatment center.

Tests then revealed the malignant melanoma cancer had spread to his lungs and liver. He received a few radiation treatments but checked out when some New York papers let on that he was seriously ill.

He went to Miami, then back to Sloan-Kettering, then Jamaica.

Why the back and forth? Some said he hadn’t much faith in “Western Medicine”.

He was advised to seek further help in Germany.

Bob and his entourage then traveled to Germany to the Bavarian Clinic of Dr. Josef Issels.

He was a specialist in Holistics, or Toxic cancer treatment. Why leave a world-renowned cancer treatment center like Sloan-Kettering to go to a holistic center?

That is a mystery to me.

While in Germany Bob Marley celebrated his 36th and final birthday. While at the center in Germany Bob Marley received such treatments as exercise, ozone injections, vitamins and trace elements.

However, as the months went by, he realized that these treatments were not working and his cancer was terminal.

 

Repeating Islands

Dr Cleland Gooding MD., F.A.A.D., a physician with a specialty in Skin Diseases employed by the Bahamas Government, has penned this intriguing article about Bob Marley’s failed treatment for skin cancer, which eventually progressed to the brain cancer responsible for his death at 36. Here are excerpts, with a link to the original article below.

Bob Marley the charismatic beloved Jamaican singer, who introduced reggae infused with Rastafarian themes died from a cancerous brain Tumor on May 11, 1981 in Miami. Florida. He was only 36 years old.

It’s been 30 years since his death; and there have many rumours and speculation about the cause of death. Did he really die from a brain tumor? Or other nefarious causes? Like the CIA? Poison in his boots etc? Bob Marley’s medical records were never made public. However from several sources I managed to piece together the story of his illness and…

View original post 1,422 more words

Inner Circle Headlines Jamaica50 Celebration NY Central Park Summer Stage w/ Israel Vibrations & The Mighty Diamonds

To anyone who’s familiar with Inner Circle, the GRAMMY® winning band’s 20-year-plus history in reggae has had a long string of successes. Inner Circle’s special brand of pop-oriented Jamaican beats and energy-filled live performances have allowed the band to transcend the traditional reggae niche and enjoy widespread crossover appeal.