Jamaican Reggae Music: An Ode to Bob Marley (List of all Bob Marley’s Albums)

By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2012, Poetess Defy, Denise Fyffe The name Jamaica is synonymous with Bob Marley, and vice versa. Jamaican Reggae Music is at the stage it is today because of this man and his efforts. Even today his album's are successful and new compilations are released by the Marley family, regularly. … Continue reading Jamaican Reggae Music: An Ode to Bob Marley (List of all Bob Marley’s Albums)

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Marijuana Growers Association Launched in Jamaica

Marijuana Growers Association Launched in Jamaica

Marijuana Growers Association Launched in Jamaica

Marijuana Growers Association Launched in Jamaica

In his article “Pot Growers Association Launched in Jamaica,” David McFadden writes that a group of influential Jamaicans gathered last Saturday to launch an association of future Marijuana cultivators as momentum builds toward loosening laws prohibiting pot on the Caribbean island.

Some 300 people, including a few medical Marijuana entrepreneurs from Canada and the U.S. state of Colorado, assembled at a conference center in downtown Kingston to officially launch the Ganja Future Growers and Producers Association. Among other things, the group will lobby for creation of a regulated cannabis industry on the tropical island that is nearly as famous for its pot as it is for its scenic beaches and unique culture.

The moderator of the Saturday event was Kingston Mayor Angela Brown-Burke, who is also a senator and a vice president of the ruling People’s National Party. Her husband, Paul Burke, is one of the leaders of the new association and also an influential PNP figure. Groups that spoke in support of the venture included the country’s scientific research council, agricultural society and the Jamaican campus of the University of the West Indies.

Jamaica has a prime opportunity to enter and revolutionize an industry that could have an enormous kickback on our growth and development potential,” said Rupert Lewis, a politics professor who spoke on behalf of the Mona campus of the University of the West Indies.

Marijuana has been pervasive but outlawed on the island for a century. But as the pot legalization movement gains unprecedented traction across the globe, most notably in the South American nation of Uruguay and the U.S. states of Colorado and Washington, there’s a growing push to lift restrictions in Jamaica to give the island’s long struggling economy a big boost.

 

Repeating Islands

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In his article “Pot Growers Association Launched in Jamaica,” David McFadden writes that a group of influential Jamaicans gathered last Saturday to launch an association of future marijuana cultivators as momentum builds toward loosening laws prohibiting pot on the Caribbean island. Read the full article in the link below:

Some 300 people, including a few medical marijuana entrepreneurs from Canada and the U.S. state of Colorado, assembled at a conference center in downtown Kingston to officially launch the Ganja Future Growers and Producers Association. Among other things, the group will lobby for creation of a regulated cannabis industry on the tropical island that is nearly as famous for its pot as it is for its scenic beaches and unique culture.

The moderator of the Saturday event was Kingston Mayor Angela Brown-Burke, who is also a senator and a vice president of the ruling People’s National Party. Her husband, Paul Burke…

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Marijuana Growers Association Launched in Jamaica

Marijuana decriminalization in Jamaica by September 2014

JAMAICA’S legislators have approved the amendment of the Dangerous Drugs Act to facilitate the decriminalization of possession of small amounts of ganja. The announcement was made by Justice Minister Mark Golding during a press conference at the Office of the Prime Minister in Kingston yesterday.

“Cabinet has approved certain changes to the law relating to ganja. These relate to the possession of small quantities of ganja for personal use, the smoking of ganja in private places and the use of ganja for medical/medicinal purposes,” Golding said.

He also announced that Cabinet had also approved the decriminalization of ganja for religious use and said he hoped the law would be amended by early September.

Trips To Paradise

Marijuana in Jamaica Marijuana in Jamaica

JAMAICA’S legislators have approved the amendment of the Dangerous Drugs Act to facilitate the decriminalisation of possession of small amounts of ganja.

The announcement was made by Justice Minister Mark Golding during a press conference at the Office of the Prime Minister in Kingston yesterday.

“Cabinet has approved certain changes to the law relating to ganja. These relate to the possession of small quantities of ganja for personal use, the smoking of ganja in private places and the use of ganja for medical/medicinal purposes,” Golding said.

He also announced that Cabinet had also approved the decriminalisation of ganja for religious use and said he hoped the law would be amended by early September.

Golding’s announcement came on the heels of recent calls by the Opposition for individuals who are held smoking a spliff to not be given a criminal record.

With the proposed changes, people caught in…

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Adidja Palmer-Vybz Kartel

Jamaican Music: Adidja Palmer / Vybz Kartel, come on down

Article originally appeared on Jamaica: Political Economy by Dennis Jones:

I believe that many lessons may be drawn from the recent murder case involving Adidja Palmer (aka ‘Vybz Kartel’) and four other defendants. Everyone who had some notion of the case is likely to have an opinion about what went on before, during and after it. Thankfully, we have a democratic society with a good amount of freedom of speech, so everyone is entitled to his or her opinion and should express it if he or she so desires. I am not going to go to a place where many will travel–putting the case into some context that suggests it is the pinnacle of a great change in Jamaican society, even if I wish that change would hurry up and come. I prefer to make some simpler points.

Adidja Palmer can be separated from Vybz Kartel (VK) in our minds, but it is very hard to see them as separate in body. Whatever we think that VK did, we have to ask ourselves what embodiment went with the action. The singing and dancing and writing of lyrics under the stage name ‘Vybz Kartel’ were a turning point in the development of Adidja Palmer. At a certain stage, Palmer got left behind and Vybz Kartel took over in the public’s consciousness. Vybz then had great success, was heralded for his ‘iconic’ lyrical and musical gifts. He showed he had a great understanding of the society in which he lived. He developed trappings of power, even naming his organization ‘Empire’–which seems grandiose, but money and power tend to do that to people’s self-perception. He began associating with richer people and people in different walks of life who wielded power. He was able to send his child to a private school. He created Street Vybz Rum. He hosted a weekly dance party Street Vybz Thursday. He got fame in a big way. hosted his own reality television show “Teacha’s Pet” on CVM Jamaica broadcast channel, the first reality television show hosted by a dancehall artist in Jamaica. He was a full-blown celebrity. He spoke at UWI, at the invitation of Professor Carolyn Cooper: he got academic approval, of sorts. He established his own label Adidjahiem/Notnice Records. He was ‘Mr. Business and Mr. Music’.

Still, Vybz Kartel was showing signs of a less-than perfect person. He got into disputes with fellow musicians. He gained notoriety for his lyrics, which contained obscene and violent references. He was banned from the airwaves; he also was banned from performing in some countries. He faced charges in 2011 for murder, conspiracy to murder and illegal possession of a firearm; he was bailed in that case but kept in jail on another murder charge , concerning the death of Clive ‘Lizard’ Williams(for which he was just being tried).

While Vybz Kartel was feeling his vibes, Adidja was somewhere else, some would have us believe. Perhaps, in the evening, a man in felt bedroom slippers and a warm cup of cocoa would pull out a copy of The Bible and read some verses. Maybe, he lamented what had happened to put him in the background and let Vybz get all the light. This is pure speculation, of course. Alternatively, Adidja was fully aware of who and what Vybz was, and the persona was just a front behind which the real, living Palmer could masquerade.

I had an interesting time with some ladies yesterday, while we discussed this topic. Here was my postulation. Imagine that a man looking like Adidja Palmer drove his car into the front of the bank and killed 6 people standing in the teller line. He gets out of the car and says “Sorry about that, I wasn’t driving or in control of the car. My persona was behind the wheel. Got to dash.” What would most sensible people think? Let Adidja Palmer walk out of the bank and wait for Vybz to come in and own up to this deed? Somehow, that “It wasn’t me” line doesn’t seem to be one that people would accept. Does it matter what the deed was? I think not.

If the person, who has two personalities, was my neighbour and associate would I feel differently? Would I say, “Man, Adidja wouldn’t do such a thing. Maybe he lost his mind.” That would help me understand. Or, “He’s pretending to be Vybz; look how he’s acting crazy.” That would also help me understand. I might even suggest that Adidja get counselling and work out the issues that were behind this split personality, that seemed to be so far apart, dare I say like Jekyll and Hyde. But, let’s leave that splitting aside for the moment.

Jamaica saw many things during the case. We saw saturated media coverage. That meant that for many it was a first look into how courts work and how the justice system functions. Judges, lawyers, juries, bailiffs, etc. The arguments and facts were sometime very complicated to follow. Many times we were given a sight of things that were not so clear and perhaps not so easy to believe. Telecom experts who told us that technology seemed more limited than we were often told it was. Cloned chips? Tampered text messages? Phones that couldn’t be traced? We heard about procedures that were shoddy at best and downright suspicious at worst. Evidence that was missing. Evidence that was open to tampering. We saw jurors run a foul of the judge and health problems that meant one had to be excused.

At the end of the case we saw what we had been awaiting: the jury were given instructions and went off to deliberate and came back with a verdict. The verdict was reached quite quickly. For some, that seemed strange. I did not think so. I did jury service when I was 18 and just a university student. Juries discuss cases as they proceed. Many jurors have their minds made up early. Many need lots of time. In the jury room, time is needed when opinions are divided and people need to be persuaded to change their views. If views are aligned, decisions can come quickly. The verdict was guilty for four of the five accused, including Palmer.

We also saw something that we honestly did not expect. We often hear about corruption in Jamaica, but by its nature it’s hard to see. But, we saw it live and direct in the courtroom. Within minutes of the verdict, we heard that one juror was to be charged with five counts of attempting to pervert the course of justice and conspiracy to pervert the course of justice, by offering a bribe to the jury foreman, which had been reported. So, it was true: money comes into cases to try to steer verdicts.We still have to wait and see if the charges sticks and what else emerges.

Towards the end of the case, public emotions appeared to run high. People began amassing around the courthouse, showing support for Vybz Karkel and Adidja Palmer. Reports are that this was a ‘rent-a-crowd’ affair. Jamaica has 17 percent unemployment and 40 percent youth unemployment. Offer people money for light or no real work and they would be fools to turn it down. Think of it like ‘Christmas work’ but without a cutlass and rake. There were some violent incidents with crowds breaking police barricades and some bottle-throwing, I understand.

Now, the verdict has been given and the court of public opinion is in session. Some stridently claim that ‘the system’ was against the accused and there could not and was not a fair trial. I’m not sure if that same argument would have been made if the verdict had been innocent. It may seem strange to some that the same system smells sweet if you get what you want, but stinks when you don’t. I’ve not figure that out, yet.

Some intellectuals have put forward arguments that centre on the ‘creative genius’ or ‘icon’ status of Vybz Kartel-Adidja Palmer. I hear those arguments, but don’t understand what they are meant to prove in terms of what was the charge. Many great artistes are flawed, some severely so. We read almost daily of ‘stars’ who are in trouble with the law. Just this morning, I read about Kanye West and a battering charge. I don’t think I need to list all the instances. Some of these flawed characters appear more associated with some musical genres, say hip-hop and rap in the US. Some American artistes have openly claimed criminal backgrounds, eg Ice T (bank robbery), Snoop Dogg (marijuana and firearms). But, Jamaica has its notoriety, eg Buju Banton (cocaine trafficking and firearms). Such flaws are not unique to musicians. It may be part of what it takes to be great in ‘creative’ fields; it could just be part of the human condition.

Many people see the case as exceptional in that money and position (albeit gained through music) did not seem to sway the court decision. Many wonder aloud what would have happened if the case had concerned someone identifiably from Jamaica’s upper classes.

We saw the Director of Public Prosecutions happy that the prosecution case held up. She has begun an inquiry into procedural inefficiencies and revamping the protocols relating to the storage of items pertaining to cases before the courts.

Nothing is perfect in the world. I saw the justice system working and it seemed to perform well. Are there flaws? Sure. The system is compromised in many ways, however, importantly by negative feelings about the police and their impartiality and honesty.

People have vested interests. Did those dominate the proceedings? I don’t think so in any clear way.

Jamaica: Political Economy

I believe that many lessons may be drawn from the recent murder case involving Adidja Palmer (aka ‘Vynz Kartel’) and four other defendants. Everyone who had some notion of the case is likely to have an opinion about what went on before, during and after it. Thankfully, we have a democratic society with a good amount of freedom of speech, so everyone is entitled to his or her opinion and should express it if he or she so desires. I am not going to go to a place where many will travel–putting the case into some context that suggests it is the pinnacle of a great change in Jamaican society, even if I wish that change would hurry up and come. I prefer to make some simpler points.

Adidja Palmer can be separated from Vybz Kartel (VK) in our minds

Adidja Palmer-Vybz Kartel Adidja Palmer-Vybz Kartel

, but it is very…

View original post 1,484 more words

Jamaica Largest Caribbean Supplier of Marijuana to the US

Jamaica Largest Caribbean Supplier of Marijuana to the US

Jamaica Largest Caribbean Supplier of Marijuana to the US

Reblogged –

Blame it on Jamaica. According to the 2014 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report released by the United States, the US State Department said Jamaica continued to make slow progress in combating narcotics trafficking, corruption and organized crime in 2013.  It asserts that Jamaica remains the largest Caribbean supplier of marijuana to the US and other Caribbean islands, and that even though cocaine and synthetic drugs are not produced locally, Jamaica is a transit point for drugs trafficked from South America to North America and other international markets. In the article below, it is hard to tell whether the report focuses on the “inefficient criminal justice system” in both countries or only in Jamaica.

[The report] said success stories included the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) Anti-Corruption Branch, which continued to make progress in eliminating corrupt and unethical police officers; the National Forensic Sciences Laboratory, which showed dramatic improvement in its ability to process crime scene ballistic evidence; the JCF Major Organized Crime and Anti-Corruption Task Force, which significantly reduced Jamaica lottery scam operations that targeted retirees and the elderly in the US.

Washington said the Financial Investigation Division of the Ministry of Finance that, with new organization and leadership, ramped up its efforts to curb money laundering and seize criminally-acquired assets and also praised the Independent Commission of Investigations (INDECOM) which was successful in establishing its legal authority to prosecute police officers who illegally injure or kill citizens in the course of their duties.

“The momentum of progress gained within Jamaica’s law enforcement agencies, however, is being obstructed by the inability of prosecutors and the courts to keep apace and secure prompt convictions.  The United States will therefore continue to support efforts to reform and strengthen Jamaica’s criminal court system,” the report noted.

The report noted that in 2013, drug production and trafficking were both enabled and accompanied by organized crime, domestic and international gang activity, and police and government corruption. It said illicit drugs were also a common means of exchange for illegally-trafficked firearms entering the country, exacerbating Jamaica’s security situation. Drugs flow from and through Jamaica by maritime conveyance, air freight, and human couriers, and to a limited degree by private aircraft.

“Drugs leaving Jamaica are bound for the United States, Canada and other Caribbean nations.  However, marijuana and cocaine are also trafficked from Jamaica into the United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands. Jamaica is emerging as a transit point for cocaine leaving Central America and destined for the United States, and some drug trafficking organizations exchange Jamaican marijuana for cocaine.”

The report notes that factors that contribute to drug trafficking include the country’s convenient geographic position as a waypoint for narcotics trafficked from Latin America; its lengthy, rugged and difficult-to- patrol coastline; a high volume of tourist travel and airline traffic; its status as a major trans-shipment hub for maritime containerized cargo; inadequate educational and employment opportunities for at-risk youth who engage in crime; and a struggling economy that encourages marijuana cultivation in rural areas.

INEFFICIENT CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM: Washington said that while the government and law enforcement authorities are committed to combating narcotics and illicit trafficking, their efforts were only moderately effective in 2013 because of a lack of sufficient resources; corruption; an inefficient criminal justice system; and the inability of lawmakers to adopt meaningful legislation to combat corruption and gangs. [. . .]

Repeating Islands

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Blame it on Jamaica. According to the 2014 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report released by the United States, the US State Department said Jamaica continued to make slow progress in combating narcotics trafficking, corruption and organized crime in 2013.  It asserts that Jamaica remains the largest Caribbean supplier of marijuana to the US and other Caribbean islands, and that even though cocaine and synthetic drugs are not produced locally, Jamaica is a transit point for drugs trafficked from South America to North America and other international markets. In the article below, it is hard to tell whether the report focuses on the “inefficient criminal justice system” in both countries or only in Jamaica.

[The report] said success stories included the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) Anti-Corruption Branch, which continued to make progress in eliminating corrupt and unethical police officers; the National Forensic Sciences Laboratory, which showed dramatic improvement in its ability…

View original post 409 more words