Book Excerpt On The Guidance Counsellor’s Handbook by Denise N. Fyffe

The Guidance Counsellor’s Handbook by Denise N. Fyffe

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While pursuing my studies in counselling, I noticed that all the books we used were from overseas authors. As such, I decided to ensure that I represented for our country as well. It is the responsibility of writers, who can, to not be selfish in their endeavors, but to think about our countries welfare as well.

You will find that the knowledge contained in this book encapsulates the history and overall growth of school counselling in the western Hemisphere.

Excerpt

Responsibilities to Students

The professional school counsellor has a primary obligation to the student, who is to be treated with respect as a unique individual[1]. This ensures and encourages the self-esteem and confidence of that student. In treating the individual with respect the counsellor is therefore enforcing and upholding the basic right and constitution of the individual. The counsellor is also concerned with the educational, academic, career, personal and social needs and encourages the maximum development of every student. It is the responsibility of the counsellor to act as facilitator/overseer, the one who ensures if no one else does, that the child is receiving education and that they grow as a complete and healthy human being. Also this allows the counsellor to identify the specific needs of this ‘unique’ child and in most cases train, coach, and teach them.

Another responsibility of the school counsellor is to respect the student’s values and beliefs and do not impose their (the counsellor’s) personal values. This is compulsory because every individual have a right and freedom to possess their own particular belief. They should be informed that they (the student) have a right to express their beliefs. The counsellor should advise the student that they too should respect other’s differences and diverse nature. Knowledge of the laws, regulations and policies is compulsory as it relates to students, and counsellor must strive to protect and inform students regarding their rights. Without knowledge we cannot function and perform our tasks. If the counsellor does not know what atrocities are being committed against a student, then he/she will not be able to protect them.

*****

Read more in The Guidance Counsellor’s Handbook

guidance-counsThe Guidance Counsellor’s Handbook, introduces the Jamaican educational system and highlights the psychometric movement, the trait and factor theory as well as legislation that impacted the development of present guidelines and ethical standards. It also explores the counselling process, issues of school management, school organisational structure and several counselling techniques which are apt for the school setting. The book also examines the various roles and responsibilities of a Jamaican Guidance Counsellor and provides a list of resource centers in Jamaica.

Available at all online book retailers and Amazon.com.

Follow her on: social-media2

Copyright © 2016, Denise N. Fyffe, The Island Journal

Study Reveals That Bad Bosses Can Make Employees Sick

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For 75% of Americans, bosses are a major cause of stress at work.

A Linkedin article published by Quartz magazine reveals that a bad boss can be as harmful to employees as passive smoking. The article also says that the longer you stay in a job working for someone who stresses you, the greater the damage is to your physical and mental health.

According to Quartz, data from the American Psychology Association shows that 75% of American workers believe their bosses are a major cause of stress at work. However, 59% of them would not leave the job.

Statistics show that employees get used to their jobs despite the fact that they are unhappy. This further complicates their process of resignation as they are no longer motivated to search for a healthier working environment which could improve their situation.

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Worse than cigarettes

Researchers at the Harvard Business School and Stanford University in the United States gathered data from over 200 studies and found that stress at work can be as harmful to the health as the exposure to a considerable amount of smoke from other people’s cigarettes just like passive smoking.

The main reason for stress at work for most employees is the risk of losing their jobs. As a consequence, chances are that these employees are 50% more prone to health problems than their colleagues. Employees in a demanding job are expected to deliver more than they can give and this increases their chances of acute health problems by 35%.

Survival

In some cases, the problems with the bosses are merely a matter of affinity. However, there are many bosses like Miranda Priestly (from “The Devil Wears Prada”) in real life.

But how do you recognize whether you belong to the first category or the second?

Bad bosses are overly aggressive, narcissistic and even violent sometimes. They often say phrases like “We’ve always done it like”, “You can count yourself lucky to even have a job” and “This place is a mess when I’m not around.”

Given the present market conditions, it is not an easy decision to quit one’s job and start over entirely. This soon becomes a habit and the level of motivation sinks. Here are some simple strategies that can help you survive moments of professional crises:

1. Make a list of the day’s goals and strike the items off as you complete them. This feeling of having done something can help you move on.

2. Turn off your email and work phone over the weekend. This can help recharge your personal battery for a short while.

 

Source: Study Reveals That A Bad Boss Can Make Employees Sick

Book Excerpt On Jamaican Guidance Counsellor’s Handbook by Denise N. Fyffe

jamaican guidance counsellor

 

Introduction

Mrs. Goodrich showed up to the Fairies Secondary School as usual, looking forward to the challenges that would greet her in her chosen profession, as a School counsellor. Her day was particularly hectic and burdensome, as several boys got in trouble for missing classes and gathering at the back of the school and she was expected to ‘set di bwoy dem on di straight and narrow’, according to the principal. In addition one of her favourite students, Latoya who was of Muslim background, in her counselling session that afternoon admitted that she would not continue to college, but get a part time job, marry and have children. Mrs. Goodrich, at the end of the day, sat down, and reflected on the days occurrences. She began to wonder what was she to do as the school counsellor, and whether there were problems like this 75 years ago. Mrs. Goodrich pondered what would have happened if there were no school counsellors today?

Definition

School counselling was not born it evolved. In supporting this statement we will first look at the meaning of some key words and seek to identify issues and provide points for and/or against the topic. Born is defined as being “brought into existence; or to be created” (ask.com, 2006). According to the American Heritage Dictionary, evolve means to “develop or achieve gradually”, evolving is a process and may occur over time. Craig Charles stated that “It’s evolve or die, really, you have to evolve, you have to move on otherwise it just becomes stagnant.[1]” This can be applied to School counselling, as it has transformed from a mere larvae to the beautiful butterfly that it is today.

School counsellors are “professional members of an educational team who assists students in their personal, social, and academic, and career development aspects of education through services such as individual counseling, small group counseling, and classroom teaching, and provide leadership in educational reform (advocacy)[2];” They are traditionally known as a guidance counselor, although this term is deemed inaccurate by most professionals today.

School counselling was not born it evolved from the vocational, guidance and counselling movement of the late 19th and early 20th century. Based on the definition of the key terms one could agree that School counselling was not born, but it has evolved over time. Also, School counselling adopted its functions and design from the vocational counselling field and applied it to schools, the formal institutions that ‘house’ this field today. School counselling is a relatively new field, compared to other fields of study. It is a process and the rules and guidelines that are the guideposts for it today, were changed in the past, are changing in the present and will continue to evolve in the future.

History of School Counselling

School counselling branched out of the vocational guidance movement, in the United States at the beginning of the 20th century. This was due to the societal, political, educational, trade and industry developments of the time. Jesse B. Davis is deemed the first to offer a methodical school guidance program, in 1907. In 1908, the “Father of Vocational Guidance” Frank Parsons, established the Bureau of Vocational Guidance to assist young people in making the transition from school to work. Other pioneers such as David Hill, Anna Reed and Eli Weaver had a different approach as they created guidance services which sought to make students employable.

The 1920s to the 1930s saw ascension in the interest of school counselling and guidance because of the rise of progressive education in schools. There were no set standards that were accepted by all, for training and various philosophies were propagated. However, personal, social, and moral developments were accentuated. “Many schools reacted to this movement as anti-educational, saying that schools should teach only the fundamentals of education. This, combined with the economic hardship of the Great Depression, led to a decline in school counselling and guidance” (Wikipedia, 2006).

References

  1. A Brief History of School Counseling; Retrieved on September 30, 2006
  2. Baker, S.B. (1992). School counseling for the twenty-first century. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
  3. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/school_counselor
  4. http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/c/craigcharl273985.html
  5. Schmidt, J.J. (2003) Counseling in schools: Essential services and comprehensive programs. 4th ed. Boston: Allyn & Bacon

*****

Read more in Jamaican Guidance Counsellor’s Handbook

jamaican guidance counsellorThe Jamaican Guidance Counsellor’s Handbook, introduces the Jamaican educational system and highlights the psychometric movement, the trait and factor theory as well as legislation that impacted the development of present guidelines and ethical standards. It also explores the counselling process, issues of school management, school organisational structure and several counselling techniques which are apt for the school setting. The book also examines the various roles and responsibilities of a Jamaican Guidance Counsellor and provides a list of resource centers in Jamaica.

Available at all online book retailers and Amazon.com.

Follow her on: social-media2

Copyright © 2016, Denise N. Fyffe, The Island Journal

Jamaican Life Lessons: Make the best of Life

Make the best of it

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Sometimes life doesn’t go as we expect it to; but what is expected is that we make do with what we have. Make the best of Life.

By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2014, Denise N. Fyffe

5 Essential Oils Your Natural Hair Will Love!

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It’s time to step your oil game up! Not only is it inexpensive, it’s essential to the overall health of your natural hair. There are a lot of different oils out there, but there is a handful I believe work best and provide a wide-range of benefits.

Avocado Oil

Avocado oil is one of the best oils for moisturizing dry hair. It’s packed with great vitamins like B, D, & E that keep hair healthy and strong.

Jamaican Black Castor Oil (JBCO)

This is one of my favorite oils because of its thick texture. It’s great for sealing ends and because it promotes growth, it’s a great oil to use as a hot oil treatment. JBCO is also known for repairing damaged hair.

Coconut Oil

Coconut oil! A natural’s favorite. Coconut oil has many uses from promoting hair growth, moisturizing, to preventing breakage. It’s basically an all in one package. If you’re not one to use a lot of different products, this is the oil for you. It can be used for hair, skin, nails, cooking – you name it and coconut oil can do it!

Peppermint Oil

I wouldn’t put this oil directly on your hair, but it’s great for the scalp. Use peppermint oil to stimulate hair growth and keep your scalp from creating build up. Remember to dilute with another oil or water. I made the mistake of putting it directly on and I nearly burned my scalp to a crisp. Learn from my mistake and dilute, dilute, dilute!

Olive Oil

Olive Oil is considered to be the “godmother” of hair oil. Like coconut oil, this is a staple for most naturals. It’s the one oil everyone is familiar with and is most likely in your kitchen right now. This is great to use for deep conditioning, hot oil treatments, or simply to seal in moisture from your leave-in conditioner.

Remember you can always mix and match your oils. Create your own concoction that meets the needs of your own hair. I use these oils separately, but I also have a mix I use for different things, so experiment!

Praise Houston

© Copyright 2012 CorbisCorporation

It’s time to step your oil game up! Not only is it inexpensive, it’s essential to the overall health of your natural hair. There are a lot of different oils out there, but there is a handful I believe work best and provide a wide-range of benefits. Try using these five oils your hair will love you for!

Avocado Oil

Avocado oil is one of the best oils for moisturizing dry hair. It’s packed with great vitamins like B, D, & E that keep hair healthy and strong.

RELATED: How To Go Natural For CHEAP! [ORIGINAL]

Jamaican Black Castor Oil (JBCO)

This is one of my favorite oils because of its thick texture. It’s great for sealing ends and because it promotes growth, it’s a great oil to use as a hot oil treatment. JBCO is also known for repairing damaged hair.

RELATED: 5 Great Products To Keep Natural Hair…

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Why Should We Deep Condition Our Hair?


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Image courtesy of purecoconutoilguide.com

Deep conditioning (DC) is important to maintaining healthy and happy hair – natural or relaxed. If performed on a regular basis, this treatment helps our hair retain moisture and protects it “deep” within the fiber to support the hair until the next treatment. The protective action of regular conditioners last only a few days. Therefore, more dedicated and regular DC efforts are needed, states Audrey Davis-Sivasothy, author of the The Science of Black Hair: A Comprehensive Guide to Textured Hair Care.

I apply DC treatments to my hair at least twice per month using one of my DIY concoctions*. If you are experiencing extremely dry or damaged hair, this treatment is suggested once a week until your hair regains its strength. After that point, frequency is based on personal preference. After a treatment, I can immediately notice how soft and moisturized my hair feels. My curls and coils are more defined and the elasticity is amazing!

I rarely (if ever) use heat on my hair except when deep conditioning. I like the Thermal Spa Conditioning Heat Cap. It was recommended by another Natural and I’ve used it for about 2 years. There are three heat settings but I find the lowest setting works well for me. Although heated treatments are effective, the natural warmth from our scalp and bodies is just as effective.

Thermal Spa Conditioning Heat Cap

Below is my typical DC routine. I make minor adjustments as needed but basically this is one key element to how I maintain soft, moisturized and manageable hair.

My DC Routine

  • After shampooing, I apply the conditioner to my hair in small sections ensuring full coverage (much like applying a relaxer). I pay special attention to the ends. This is the oldest part of our hair and requires extra care
  • I detangle with my fingers as I go along and make 6-8 chunky twists. This method keeps my hair from re-tangling during the rinsing phase
  • I cover with a processing cap and sit with a heating cap for 30 minutes. Tip:  DCs should be left on until the hair becomes soft. This could be 15 minutes or 40 minutes. Adjust the timing according to your hair’s needs
  • I allow my hair to cool prior to rinsing
  • While still wearing the twists, I rinse thoroughly with cool water. This ensures the cuticles close properly.

Read more via Why Should We Deep Condition Our Hair? | Aim 4 Natural.

Black Hair: My Wash Day Regimen

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DSCF0378[1]So today is wash day! Keep reading to find out what I use to shampoo my hair.

In previous posts I already mentioned that I only shampoo my hair once a month; because of that, my shampooing process is more extensive to make sure I get rid of all the product and build up from the month, and to make sure I am not to harsh on my hair in the process.

The first step is the pre-poo which is basically a hot oil treatment that coats your strands so that the shampoo doesn’t overly strip your hair of its natural oils (basically acting like a barrier). This is also a great time to give yourself a scalp massage, which increases blood flow to the scalp, and aids in hair growth.

The oils I use are EVCO (Extra Virgin Coconut Oil), JBCO (Jamaican Black Castor Oil), and Darcy’s Botanicals Peppermint Scalp Elixir.

You will also need an applicator bottle.

 

The Tee-Hive

So today is wash day! Keep reading to find out what I use to shampoo my hair.

In previous posts I already mentioned that I only shampoo my hair once a month; because of that, my shampooing process is more extensive to make sure I get rid of all the product and build up from the month, and to make sure I am not to harsh on my hair in the process.

The first step is the pre-poo which is basically a hot oil treatment that coats your strands so that the shampoo doesn’t overly strip your hair of its natural oils (basically acting like a barrier). This is also a great time to give yourself a scalp massage, which increases blood flow to the scalp, and aids in hair growth.

The oils I use are EVCO (Extra Virgin Coconut Oil), JBCO (Jamaican Black Castor Oil), and Darcy’s Botanicals Peppermint…

View original post 362 more words