Treasures of Colombia Cazuela de Mariscos

Treasures of Colombia: Cazuela de Mariscos (Colombian Food)

Cazuela de Marisco -  Colombian Seafood Dish (seafood soup) Are you a seafood lover?   Yes? Great! Then the Colombian seafood dish Cazuela de Mariscos or seafood casserole (seafood soup) is for you. It is one of my personal favorites! As a Jamaican, I really do enjoy seafood of every kind- from shellfish to crustaceans. … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Cazuela de Mariscos (Colombian Food)

Recipe of the Day: Jamaican Jerk Seasoning

Jamaican Jerk Seasoning Recipe

We all love some good Jamaican Jerk food, whether its chicken, pork, fish, shrimp, etc.

Jerk just adds a whole new flavor to your meat. You can find Jerk Seasonings almost anywhere around the world, some authentic, some are not, but if you want to guarantee that you are using the best Jerk spice on your meat is to make your own.

Today we give you a quick and easy recipe to always have Jerk Seasoning on hand. Check it out below.

Ingredients for Jerk Seasoning Recipe

  1. 2 tablespoons dried minced onion
  2. 2 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme
  3. 2 teaspoons ground allspice
  4. 2 teaspoons ground black pepper
  5. 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  6. 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  7. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  8. 2 tablespoons vegetable oiI

Directions for Jerk Seasoning Recipe

In a small bowl, stir together the dried onion, thyme, allspice, ground black pepper, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, and salt. Coat meat lightly with oil, then rub seasoning onto meat.

Enjoy

 

Re-blogged from ReCaFo:

JamaFo Jamaican Food

We all love some good Jerk food, whether its chicken, pork, fish, shrimp, etc., Jerk just adds a whole new flavor to your meat. You can find Jerk Seasonings almost anywhere around the world, some authentic, some are not, but if you want to guarantee that you are using the best Jerk spice on your meat is to make your own. Today we give you a quick and easy recipe to always have Jerk Seasoning on hand. Check it out below.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons dried minced onion

  • 2 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme

  • 2 teaspoons ground allspice

  • 2 teaspoons ground black pepper

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oiI

Directions

In a small bowl, stir together the dried onion, thyme, allspice, ground black pepper, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, and salt. Coat meat lightly with oil, then rub seasoning onto meat.

Enjoy

Let us know what you think about your homemade Jerk Seasoning?…

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Jamaican Gungo Peas Soup

Recipe of the Day: Tasty Jamaican Gungo Peas Soup

Tasty Jamaican Gungo Peas Soup

There is no soup like a real Jamaican Gungo Soup.

We all remember the days from our childhood days coming up when mom and dad or grandma and grandpa would cook some rich gungo soup on the weekend and it would be filled with peas.

Today we give you a recipe to cook up your own no matter where you are. Check it out below.

Preparation time: 10m
Cooking time: 30m

Ingredients for Jamaican Gungo Soup

For 6 people

Jamaican Gungo Peas Soup

Jamaican Gungo Peas Soup

  • 2 medium irish potato
  • 1 medium cho-cho
  • 6 cups water
  • 1/2 cup Coconut Milk
  • 2 stalks escallion, crushed
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 4 small pimento berries
  • 1 packet Cock Soup Mix
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon Black Pepper
  • 1 can Gungo Peas
  • 1 cup carrots,sliced

Directions for Jamaican Gungo Soup

  1. Peel and dice potatoes and cho-cho, cover with 2 cups water and set aside.

    Jamaican Gungo Peas Soup

    Jamaican Gungo Peas Soup

  2. Bring 4 cups water to a boil and add the diced Irish potatoes and cho-cho.
  3. Add Coconut Milk, escallion, thyme, pimento berries, Cock Soup Mix, salt and Black Pepper, and simmer until potatoes and cho-cho are tender.
  4. Drain Gungo Peas and add to the soup mix along with the sliced carrots.
  5. Lower flame and continue to simmer until soup thickens.
To Serve: Soup should be served hot.
Recipe brought to you by Grace Foods.

JamaFo Jamaican Food

There is no soup like a real Jamaican Gungo Soup. We all remember the days from our childhood days coming up when mom and dad or grandma and grandpa would cook some rich gungo soup on the weekend and it would be filled with peas. Today we give you a recipe to cook up your own no matter where you are. Check it out below.

Preparation time: 10m
Cooking time: 30m

Ingredients

For 6 people ()

  • 2 medium irish potato
  • 1 medium cho-cho
  • 6 cups water
  • 1/2 cup Coconut Milk
  • 2 stalks escallion,crushed
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 4 small pimento berries
  • 1 packet Cock Soup Mix
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon Black Pepper
  • 1 can Gungo Gungo Peas
  • 1 cup carrots,sliced

Directions

  1. Peel and dice potatoes and cho-cho, cover with 2 cups water and set aside.
  2. Bring 4 cups water to a boil and add the diced Irish potatoes and cho-cho.
  3. Add Coconut Milk, escallion, thyme, pimento berries, Cock Soup Mix, salt and Black Pepper, and simmer until potatoes and cho-cho are tender.

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Jamaican Food: The Jamaican Ackee

This is another element of Jamaica that I would love to share. I absolutely love this fruit and its dishes.

The Ackee is the national fruit of Jamaica

The Ackee is the national fruit of Jamaica

The Ackee is the national fruit of Jamaica. Its name is derived from the West African Akye fufo. It is widely consumed in Jamaica, and Jamaicans are among the only people who eat it. The first evidence of ackee growing in Jamaica was found in the 1700s.

The ackee tree grows eight to fifteen meters tall. It flowers biannually, occasionally more often. The most popular Jamaican dish is known as Ackee and Saltfish (Salted Codfish), but ackee is also combined with callaloo and corned pork, mackerel, bacon or beef for other dishes. Ackee is such a universal dish, it is even eaten for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.The fruit of the ackee is not edible in its entirety, only the inner, fleshy yellow parts are consumed. The red outer shells are discarded. The presence of of hypoglycine A in the immature and over-mature fruit is found in ackee and this makes it poisonous at certain stages in its development, this is why Jamaicans believe that ackee must open naturally to avoid the toxicity. It MUST be cooked fully before consumption.

Unripened Ackee Pods

I have two ackee trees in my backyard, so my family and I enjoy ackee whenever the tree blooms, without having to buy any. Ackee trees are very common in Jamaica. After Christmas, the leftover ham from Christmas dinner was always the central meat in most of what we ate until it was all done. One year, my mother combined ackee with ham, and it has been a favourite among my family ever since. Since I’m all about experimenting, I decided to play with ackee and chicken. I sauteed some chicken breast, along with other seasonings such as sweet peppers (green, yellow, or red), onions, and tomatoes, and behold! Ackee and chicken! I even used leftover jerk chicken from Friday night once to make a Saturday evening dinner. The flavour from the jerk chicken was just absorbed by the ackee and gave it exquisite taste. I was quite impressed with myself

:)

One of my favourite breakfast dishes: Ackee and Ham with fried dumplings and fried plantains

My Mother’s Ackee and Ham with fried dumplings and fried plantains.

Ackee is such a flexible delicacy, and us Jamaicans are very unique with the myriad of ways we consume it. You can eat it with just about any meat, or any starch. For a quick breakfast or lunch I like to mush the ackee and spread it on two slices of toast, or spread it on crackers. It is more often served with fried dumplings for breakfast, and boiled dumplings for lunch/dinner. It is also served with starches such as Yams, Potatoes, Dasheen and Pumpkin.

Take A Bite

This is another element of Jamaica that I would love to share. I absolutely love this fruit and its dishes.

ackee-scaled1-600x448

The Ackee is the national fruit of Jamaica.  Its name is derived from the West African Akye fufo.  It is widely consumed in Jamaica, and Jamaicans are among the only people who eat it. The first evidence of ackee growing in Jamaica was found in the 1700s. The ackee tree grows eight to fifteen metres tall. It flowers biannually, occasionally more often. The most poular Jamaican dish is known as Ackee and Saltfish (Salted Codfish), but ackee is also combined with callaloo and corned pork, mackerel, bacon or beef for other dishes. Ackee is such a universal dish, it is even eaten for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.The fruit of the ackee is not edible in its entirety, only the inner, fleshy yellow parts are consumed. The red outer shells are discarded. The presence of…

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Treasures of Colombia Oblea

Treasures of Colombia: Oblea (Colombian Street Food)

Desserts are some of our favorite comfort foods and are enjoyed all around the globe. This is normally eaten after dinner or lunch depending on your choice. The Oblea is a traditional dessert that is famous in Colombia, Argentina, Ecuador, Guatemala, El Salvador, Venezuela, Mexico, and Greece. It is eaten any time of day and … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Oblea (Colombian Street Food)

Jamaican Blue Moutain coffee

Recipe of the Day: Jamaican Coffee Yogurt Shake

Coffee is a household beverage in Jamaica, just as it is in America. Many people, especially the older generations make coffee a part of their daily routine and our Blue Mountain Coffee which comes from the island’s highest peak is among the best in the world. Today we add a twist to your morning coffee with some yogurt. Check out the recipe below for Jamaican Coffee Yogurt Shake.

Preparation time: 10m
Cooking time: 0m

Ingredients

For 1 person ()

  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Instant Coffee
  • 1/2 cup plain unflavoured yogurt
  • 1 cup soda water
  • 6 whole ice cubes
  • 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon powder

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients except ice cubes in a blender.
  2. Blend adding the ice cubes one at a time, until smooth.

JamaFo Jamaican Food

Coffee is a household beverage in Jamaica, just as it is in America. Many people, especially the older generations make coffee a part of their daily routine and our Blue Mountain Coffee which comes from the island’s highest peak is among the best in the world. Today we add a twist to your morning coffee with some yogurt. Check out the recipe below.

Preparation time: 10m
Cooking time: 0m

Ingredients

For 1 person ()

  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Instant Coffee
  • 1/2 cup plain unflavoured yogurt
  • 1 cup soda water
  • 6 whole ice cubes
  • 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon powder

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients except ice cubes in a blender.
  2. Blend adding the ice cubes one at a time, until smooth.

via Grace Foods

Visit us at jamafo.com.

Irie

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Treasures of Colombia: Chontaduro (Colombian Street Food)

The Chontaduro or Peach Palm comes from the Palm Tree family and is very popular throughout Colombia, especially in the city of Cali. This fruit looks like really small coconuts, but the Chontaduro has a red and or bright burnt orange color. Countries such as Colombia, Brasil, Peru and Costa Rica are the largest producers … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Chontaduro (Colombian Street Food)

jamaican bammy

Recipe of the Day: Jamaican Bammy

The Bammy is a popular Jamaican starch that is well known because it goes great with the national dish, Ackee and Saltfish. Today we give the extra simple recipe for this side dish, it will be the easiest thing you have ever made in your life, not even water has this few ingredients.

JamaFo Jamaican Food

The Bammy is a popular Jamaican starch that is well known because it goes great with the national dish, Ackee and Saltfish. Today we give the extra simple recipe for this side dish, it will be the easiest thing you have ever made in your life, not even water has this few ingredients (lol). Check it out below.

Ingredients

For 1 Dozen(s) ()

  • 2 pound(s) cassava
  • 1 teaspoon(s) salt

Bammy Directions

Peel and grate cassava.  Place it in a muslin cloth, wring out and discard the juice.

Add salt to the cassava flour and mix together.

Heat bammy griddle or fry pan over moderate heat.  Place about 1 cup of the mixture in a bammy ring on the heated griddle, if not, place on a greased shallow baking or fry pan.  Press down on the mixture to flatten.  A regular bammy should be at least (6″) or 15 cm in diameter, or…

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