Limonada de Coco (Coconut Lemonade)

Treasures of Colombia: Limonada de Coco (Coconut Lemonade)

Planning to visit Colombia in the near future? If so, I strongly recommend a typical drink known to the country’s inhabitants as Limonada de Coco (Coconut Lemonade). This cool drink, I have learned, is originated from the North Coast (La Costa) of Colombia.  Limonada de Coco (Coconut Lemonade) By: Stacy Ann Smith The Northern cost … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Limonada de Coco (Coconut Lemonade)

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colombian la changua

Treasures of Colombia: La Changua (Colombian Street Food)

Coffee is said by many to be an excellent starter to your day.It helps you to wake and liven you up to start that perfect day. However, Los Rolos or Los Bogotanos (people from Bogota, the capital of Colombia, Los Boyacences from Boyacá and the natives of Cundinamarca – Central Andean region in Colombia), prefer … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: La Changua (Colombian Street Food)

Jamaican Black-Forest-Cake

Jamaican Recipe of the Day: Succulent Jamaican Black Forest Cake

Here is the recipe for one of Jamaica’s favorite and most delectable cakes, The Jamaican Black Forest Cake. This dessert will surely have you licking all ten fingers and asking for a second, third or fourth serving. Enjoy learning how to bake your own Jamaican Black Forest Cake. Jamaican Recipe of the Day: Succulent Jamaican … Continue reading Jamaican Recipe of the Day: Succulent Jamaican Black Forest Cake

Jamaican Recipe of the Day: Banana Fritters

How to make Jamaican Banana Fritters like we do in Jamaica

Jamaican Banana Fritters
Prep Time: 7 mins
Cook Time: 12-18 minutes
Makes 9 fritters

 

Ingredients

* 2 very ripe bananas
* ½ cup of flour, sifted
* ½ tbsp vanilla
* ½ tsp baking powder
* 1 egg, beaten
* 1.5 tbsp sugar
* 2 pinches salt
* ½ tsp cinnamon
* ¼ cup milk
* Sprinkle of nutmeg (optional)
 

How to make it:

  1. Crush bananas and combine with all the ingredients except flour and baking powder.
  2. Sift flour and baking powder into the mixture and mix evenly.
  3. Spoon mixture into greased pan over medium heat and cook on each side for 2-3 minutes.
  4. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar (1/2 tsp cinnamon and 1 tsp sugar)
TIP: Serve at room temperature. Great snack! Live, Love, Eat!

The Yummy Truth

At Miss Universe one of the questions for our online videos was, if you were a food what would it be? I answered that I would be a banana because it is versatile, in Jamaica we eat it green and we also eat it ripe; I believe, like the banana, I have something for everyone. People probably doubted my belief in the versatility of the banana. Now whilst I was impressed with my on the spot answer, I really love the flexibility of this fruit. In addition to it being long, firm, curved and full of energy – get  your mind out of the gutter! Lol – you can do something with it in all its stages.

Although you can boil green banana to go with your main meals, use a ripe but firm banana in your smoothies or add them to your cereal, I am going to focus on the…

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Jamaican Recipe of the Day: Jamaican Gungo Peas and Rice

The Gungo bean is the next most popular bean protein in Jamaica right after the Red Peas.

The Jamaican Gungo pea is a leguminous shrub that can attain heights of 5 m. This plant probably evolved in South Asia and appeared about 2000 BC in West Africa, which is considered a second major center of origin.

The slave trade took the Jamaican Gungo pea to the West Indies, where its use as bird feed led to the name “Jamaican Gungo pea” in 1692.

You can get the Jamaican Gungo Peas in your nearest food market where it is sold in cans and mostly imported from Jamaica or Central America. Check out the recipe below.

JamaFo (Jamaican Food)

The Gungo bean is the next most popular bean protein in Jamaica right after the Red Peas. The Jamaican Gungo pea is a leguminous shrub that can attain heights of 5 m. Jamaican Gungo pea probably evolved in South Asia and appeared about 2000 BC in West Africa, which is considered a second major center of origin. The slave trade took the Jamaican Gungo pea to the West Indies, where its use as bird feed led to the name “Jamaican Gungo pea” in 1692. You can get the Jamaican Gungo Peas in your nearest food market where it is sold in cans and mostly imported from Jamaica or Central America. Check out the recipe below.

Difficulty: Easy

Preparation time: 10m

Cooking time: 30m

Ingredients

For 4 people

  • 1 ounce(s) Anchor Butter, Unsalted
  • 2 ounce(s) onion, chopped
  • 1 ounce(s) garlic, crushed
  • 1 ounce(s) escallion, chopped
  • 1 sprig(s) thyme
  • 1 teaspoon(s)…

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