Treasures of Colombia Oblea

Treasures of Colombia: Oblea (Colombian Street Food)

Desserts are some of our favorite comfort foods and are enjoyed all around the globe. This is normally eaten after dinner or lunch depending on your choice. The Oblea is a traditional dessert that is famous in Colombia, Argentina, Ecuador, Guatemala, El Salvador, Venezuela, Mexico, and Greece. It is eaten any time of day and … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Oblea (Colombian Street Food)

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Jamaican Blue Moutain coffee

Recipe of the Day: Jamaican Coffee Yogurt Shake

Coffee is a household beverage in Jamaica, just as it is in America. Many people, especially the older generations make coffee a part of their daily routine and our Blue Mountain Coffee which comes from the island’s highest peak is among the best in the world. Today we add a twist to your morning coffee with some yogurt. Check out the recipe below for Jamaican Coffee Yogurt Shake.

Preparation time: 10m
Cooking time: 0m

Ingredients

For 1 person ()

  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Instant Coffee
  • 1/2 cup plain unflavoured yogurt
  • 1 cup soda water
  • 6 whole ice cubes
  • 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon powder

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients except ice cubes in a blender.
  2. Blend adding the ice cubes one at a time, until smooth.

JamaFo Jamaican Food

Coffee is a household beverage in Jamaica, just as it is in America. Many people, especially the older generations make coffee a part of their daily routine and our Blue Mountain Coffee which comes from the island’s highest peak is among the best in the world. Today we add a twist to your morning coffee with some yogurt. Check out the recipe below.

Preparation time: 10m
Cooking time: 0m

Ingredients

For 1 person ()

  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Instant Coffee
  • 1/2 cup plain unflavoured yogurt
  • 1 cup soda water
  • 6 whole ice cubes
  • 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon powder

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients except ice cubes in a blender.
  2. Blend adding the ice cubes one at a time, until smooth.

via Grace Foods

Visit us at jamafo.com.

Irie

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Treasures of Colombia: Chontaduro (Colombian Street Food)

The Chontaduro or Peach Palm comes from the Palm Tree family and is very popular throughout Colombia, especially in the city of Cali. This fruit looks like really small coconuts, but the Chontaduro has a red and or bright burnt orange color. Countries such as Colombia, Brasil, Peru and Costa Rica are the largest producers … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Chontaduro (Colombian Street Food)

Jamaican Food: Vacation in Negril – Jerk Chicken, Curry Goat and Soursop

Ackee and saltfish? Jerk chicken?

I was very excited about these Jamaican dishes. I had no idea what ackee was, and did not know what spices are in the jerk seasoning. Aside from all kinds of drinks with Jamaican rum, I set it as my mission to find soursop juice. Another ingredient I did not know.

The common carbs on a plate is of course rice and peas ─ rice and usually kidney beans cooked with coconut milk. We were at a supermarket in Negril. Those kidney beans looking beans were labeled as “red peas.”

During our five-day trip, I tried jerk chicken from five different places and jerk pork from two. Jerk seasoning is the

Jerk chicken from Margaritaville at the Montego Bay airport.

Jamaican style barbecue rub. Some are spicier than others. You can find jerk pork, jerk conch and other grilled meat with jerk seasoning, but jerk chicken is the most popular. Be sure you look for street food stands with a grill made out of an oil barrel. Highly likely that’s where you would find the best jerk chicken of your trip.

If you happen to stay in Grand Palladium resort, the jerk chicken that comes with paella from the Jerk Hut at Sunset Cove is probably the best you would get in the resort. Check their hours so that you don’t miss it. The jerk chicken at the second floor restaurant Xaymaica was good. Don’t get it from the Poseidon restaurant at Sunset Cove! (In fact, don’t eat there…) If you try jerk chicken from the buffet, chances are what you have does not do this famous dish justice.

The best jerk chicken we had was from a stand at a parking lot across the street from Rick’s Cafe. Our tour guide said this guy

won a national “jerk off” jerk chicken contest before.

We got an order of jerk chicken for six dollars. Aaron said it was the best six dollars we spent over there. It was so good that I forgot to take a picture. The chicken was so tender, moist and well-seasoned. Nothing beats grilling over charcoal. That smoky taste made the chicken so much better. All the jerk chicken we tried in our resort could not compare. His jerk seasoning is better than all other ones that I tried.

The flavor was one of the biggest differences from this street food jerk chicken and what we had at the hotel. The jerk spice blended together very well. Normally if you let a sauce or marinade sit overnight or longer, the flavors come together. The sauce of the jerk chicken that we had at the Poseidon restaurant of the resort tasted like they just whipped everything together and brushed it on the chicken.

curry goat

Curry goat is another must-eat. I only got to try it once though, at the Xaymaica restaurant of the Grand Palladium resort. I thought goat would be tough, but surprisingly it was more tender than I expected. I was happy with what I got.

The national dish of Jamaica is ackee and saltfish. Ackee is a local fruit that kind of looks like scrambled eggs in this dish. I again only tried it once at the same restaurant. I was not impressed. The saltfish, supposedly dried codfish, was very very dried. I

was convinced that the hotel cooking did not do this national dish justice.

From my search prior to the trip, I read about this soursop drink but never saw it in the resort. I asked our super nice waiter at the Xaymaica restaurant. He said he was in fact going back home that weekend and would be picking soursop and making soursop juice with his family. That confirmed my mission searching for soursop was not crazy and made me want to try it even more.

When I saw soursop juice in a bottle at the supermarket we stopped in at Negril, I was so excited! I did not quite know what to

expect. This is what I read online: “It tastes like a combination of strawberry and pineapple, with a hint of creaminess and sour citrus.” That really does not help. And the store bought juice did not taste like what this description said either. The drink I bought was sweet and a bit thick. If you have ever tried the Japanese uncarbonated soft drink, Calpis, then you would have an idea. Calpis was what the store bought soursop drink tasted like. The consistency was in between Calpis and Asian yogurt drink.

Red Stripe is the most common beer in Jamaica. Many people buy Blue Mountain coffee or Appleton Estate rum as souvenirs. I personally did not like the almost whiskey taste of Jamaican rum. A friend of mine who used to work at this coffee shop for coffee connoisseurs said the Blue Mountain coffee that I bought from the resort was very good.

Near and Far

Ackee and fish? Jerk chicken? I was very excited about these Jamaican dishes. I had no idea what ackee was, and did not know what spices are in the jerk seasoning. Aside from all kinds of drinks with Jamaican rum, I set it as my mission to find soursop juice. Another ingredient I did not know.

牙買加必吃的當地菜色充滿我看不懂的食材或調味,像是阿開木煮鹹魚ackee and saltfish(又叫西非荔枝果) 或者牙買加香料雞jerk chicken。

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Treasures of Colombia: Aborrajado (Colombian Street Food)

Looking for a sweet mouthwatering snack? Look no further, the Colombian Aborrajado will satiate your taste buds. This exclusive dish will blow your palate away with its combination of ingredients that you wouldn’t even imagine could work together to create such a unique taste.   Treasures of Colombia: Aborrajado (Colombian Street Food) By: Stacey -Ann … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Aborrajado (Colombian Street Food)

Recipe of the Day: Jamaican Yam Salad

The yam is a popular root foot found all over the Caribbean. This starch comes in different types and varieties and is a popular food all around the world.

However, yams and cassava in Jamaican were raised to fame when track star Usain Bolt’s talent was claimed to be related to yam and cassava consumption.

Today, we offer you a great Jamaican Yam Salad recipe to accompany your Sunday dinner. You may not get as fast as Usain Bolt, but it is a start.

Recipe of the Day: Jamaican Yam Salad

Preparation time: 10m
Cooking time: 15m

Ingredients

For 6 people

  • 2 pounds yellow yam
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 pound string beans
  • 1/4 pound carrots
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 small red sweet pepper
  • 1 small green sweet pepper
  • 1 can Green Peas
  • 4 tablespoons Mayonnaise
  • 4 large lettuce leaves

Directions

  1. Peel, wash and cut yellow yam into cubes.
  2. Bring water to a boil in a sauce pot, add yam and salt and boil until fork tender.
  3. Cut string beans into three or four pieces, peel and dice carrots, blanch vegetables.

  4. Chop onions and peppers, add yam, vegetables, Green Peas, Mayonnaise and toss lightly.
  5. Put the salad to chill in a refrigerator for about 30 minutes.To Serve: Arrange on a bed of lettuce and then serve.

Enjoy.

JamaFo Jamaican Food

The yam is a popular root foot found all over the Caribbean. This starch comes in different types and varieties and is a popular food all around the world. However, yams in Jamaican were raised to fame when track star Usain Bolt’s talent was claimed to be related to yam consumption. Today we offer you a great yam recipe to accompany your Sunday dinner. You may not get as fast as Usain Bot, but it is a start.

Preparation time: 10m
Cooking time: 15m

Ingredients

For 6 people ()

  • 2 pounds yellow yam
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 pound string beans
  • 1/4 pound carrots
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 small red sweet pepper
  • 1 small green sweet pepper
  • 1 can Green Peas
  • 4 tablespoons Mayonnaise
  • 4 large lettuce leaves

Directions

  1. Peel, wash and cut yellow yam into cubes.
  2. Bring water to a boil in a sauce pot, add yam and salt and boil until fork tender.
  3. Cut string beans into three or four pieces, peel and dice carrots, blanch vegetables.
  4. Chop onions…

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Arepa de Queso

Treasures of Colombia: Colombian Arepa de Queso (Colombian Street Food)

Arepa De Queso is like the Jamaican Corn Bread and Cheese. For many years, there has been a dispute between the Colombians and the Venezuelans about who invented the “Arepa de Queso”. Up until today´s date, the battle is still on. In Colombia, the best Arepa de queso is said to have come from Boyacá … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Colombian Arepa de Queso (Colombian Street Food)

Treasures of Colombia: Buñuelos or Colombian Fry Dumpling (Colombian Street Food)

Today, we will savor a taste of The Buñuelo. It is a  Fried Dough Ball or a Colombian Traditional Christmas Snack .  According to Wikipedia, "In 711, the Islāmic Arab and Moors of Berber descent in Northern Africa, crossed the Strait of Gibraltar to the Iberian Peninsula and conquered Iberia (Medieval Spain) and ruled for eight … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Buñuelos or Colombian Fry Dumpling (Colombian Street Food)

treasures of colombia ancheros-arroz

Treasures of Colombia: Colombian Arroz Ranchero (Colombian Street Food)

Hungry and tyad and need a one-pot meal? Try the Colombian Arroz Ranchero which is similar to the Jamaican Seasoned Rice. This famous comfort food is also eaten on special occasions and is said to originate in Mexico. However, here in Colombia, each region has its own version of this diverse dish;, plus it is … Continue reading Treasures of Colombia: Colombian Arroz Ranchero (Colombian Street Food)