Jamaican Poetry: Seething


By: Denise N. Fyffe.
Copyright © 2017, Poetess Defy, Denise N. Fyffe

I hiss mi teet an seethe
Like a cobra coiled
Deliberating…

Execute fury or
Recoil;
I hiss mi teet an seethe.

Mi mind racing thru corridors
Like a Amtrak train
Seeking recourse, seeking solution.
Meanwhile di devils chirp
Their song in mi head
Claro 3G break free…’
I goin to break somin yes
Two months,
Two significant problems
Too much;

I hiss mi teet and seethe.

Dis lady seh I mus seek recourse
Fi a five thousand dollars
I goin to seek
Judgement;
I hiss mi teet and seethe.

Di devils continue fi sing deh song

‘Claro 3G break free…’
I feel di tidal wave break in mi head.
I recoil and
Deliberate…
I hiss mi teet and seethe.

Jamaican Poetry: Muse (You are) by Denise N. Fyffe


You are the red bull to my system
The diesel to my engine
Thinking of you makes me want to give up religion
Looking into your intriguing brown eyes
Makes me want to jump that window//
And sit on your thighs;

Jamaican Poetry: I want to find the one


I want to find the one
That is worthy of me,
Will let me be the butterfly and hawk,
Coexisting in this one body;
I wanna let them be
Let them feel safe to be,
A lion, a beetle, to simply be free
But to take me along Not just for me
But because, they cannot be Without me;

Jamaican Poets: Judge not


Until the words fall from a man’s lips

or the actions from his heart,

never judge his deeds.

Else, the microscope in the sun will also be turned on you.- Poetess Denise Fyffe

Copyright © 2017, Denise N. Fyffe

Jamaican Poets: I DARE you


I DARE you to be me for a day.

I DARE you to walk in my ‘way’.

Fight the enemies I have.

Befriend the angels, as FRIENDS.

I DARE you to be me, and still breathe peacefully.- Poetess Denise Fyffe

Copyright © 2014, Denise N. Fyffe

International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 8 – Zainab Bangura


We continue to celebrate the women of the world, Zainab Banguranot only on one day, International Women’s Day, but for as long as we can. Enjoy the post, original posted on Huffington Post:

8. Zainab Bangura pushed countries to recognize that sexual violence in conflict has to stop.

As the U.N. special representative on sexual violence in conflict, Zainab Bangura has seen first-hand the devastating effect of rape used as a weapon of war. Bangura, who lived through the 1991-2002 civil war in her native Sierra Leone, told Reuters: “For me, one rape is too many.”

Since she took up the role in 2012, Zainab Bangura says she has seen “a political momentum that is unprecedented” to combat sexual violence in conflict, including a U.N. declaration in which 140 member states have committed to ending rape in conflict, Buzzfeed reported. In February, Bangura’s office struck another victory when the U.N. and African Union signed an agreement to prevent and respond to conflict-related violence in Africa.

Zainab Bangura gives a press conference at the United Nations office in Nairobi on April 4, 2013. (TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)

Zainab Bangura gives a press conference at the United Nations office in Nairobi on April 4, 2013. (TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)

International Women’s Day: 8 Women who made the World a better place in 2014 – Part 7 – Lena Klimova


We continue to celebrate the women of the world, Lena Klimovanot only on one day, International Women’s Day, but for as long as we can. Enjoy the post, original posted on Huffington Post:

7. Lena Klimova gave Russian gay teens a voice online.

Just days before the Sochi Winter Olympics opened in February, young journalist Lena Klimova was charged under Russia’s controversial ban on “gay propaganda.” Authorities targeted Klimova because of her incredibly popular “Youth-404″ website (404 designating “page not found”) where gay teens write about their struggles with homophobia in the country.

Faced with a stringent fine, Lena Klimova was most concerned about Russian youth losing access to the forum, according to The Guardian. “If it will be closed, LGBT teenagers will lose the only place where they can openly speak about themselves and receive advice they need to live. It will be a catastrophe,” she wrote on Facebook. But with the world’s attention on Russia during the Olympics in Sochi the case was halted and Klimova’s website was able to give a voice to outcast teenagers for at least a while longer.

Lena Klimova pictured in a handout photo. (Elena Klimova)

Lena Klimova pictured in a handout photo. (Elena Klimova)