St. Kitts & Nevis: Tale Of Two Cities

This is a tale of two sisters, one called St. Kitts and the other called Nevis. Both islands were originally settled by Indians from South America. Later France, Britain, and Spain argued over possession throughout the 16th century. By 1623, the British won and started cultivating sugar on plantations that were worked by large numbers of slaves.

St. Kitts is a lush tropical paradise. At the center of St. Kitts and Nevis stands the spectacular, cloud-fringed peak of Mount Liamuiga, covered by a dense tropical cloud forest filled with elusive green Vervet Monkeys and brilliant tropical flowers. Whether you want to stretch out on the beach, lime (hanging out and just getting away from it all) with the Kittitians, or take a hike or a bike tour, all is there at your fingertips.

The island also has a large selection of historical sites to explore. Basseterre, the capital city, still has many French, English, and Spanish influences. The town’s central roundabout, with the Victorian Circus Clock that has a four-sided face, was named after Piccadilly Circus in London. The area is full of shops and restaurants. You can have an enjoyable time in the capital. A block east is the area known as Independence Square, once home to the Slave Market but now a commercial district.

On Old Road the Brimstone Hill Fortress, a UNESCO World Heritage site, was built over a century starting in 1690. The fortress was built out of black volcanic rock (brimstone). I suggest an hour and a half to really explore this British military architecture. It is a definitely a grand view worth seeing. A gift shop is on site.

 

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