Jamaican Poetry: Seething


By: Denise N. Fyffe.
Copyright © 2017, Poetess Defy, Denise N. Fyffe

I hiss mi teet an seethe
Like a cobra coiled
Deliberating…

Execute fury or
Recoil;
I hiss mi teet an seethe.

Mi mind racing thru corridors
Like a Amtrak train
Seeking recourse, seeking solution.
Meanwhile di devils chirp
Their song in mi head
Claro 3G break free…’
I goin to break somin yes
Two months,
Two significant problems
Too much;

I hiss mi teet and seethe.

Dis lady seh I mus seek recourse
Fi a five thousand dollars
I goin to seek
Judgement;
I hiss mi teet and seethe.

Di devils continue fi sing deh song

‘Claro 3G break free…’
I feel di tidal wave break in mi head.
I recoil and
Deliberate…
I hiss mi teet and seethe.

Jamaican Poetry: Dis Journalist Mad


By: Denise N. Fyffe.
Copyright © 2017, Poetess Defy, Denise N. Fyffe

Now tell mi if di journalist nuh mad,
Fi go look pon 20 foot wave,
A wash pon land.
Afta yuh see sey one camera man almost drown,
Yuh a try get shot of Palisadoes grung;

Is anyting else damage?
Is yuh car alright?
Cause mi waan fi knuh,
Wah yuh a do inna storm 2’oclock a night?

Now tell mi if dis journalist nuh crazy,
Dem a go geh wi heart failure,
Or mek we have premature baby.
We jus waan knuh sey oonu safe an sound;
We nuh waan visit nuh burial ground.
Next ting di eulogy go read,
Great Jamaican, good friend father of some well sown seed;

Please mi a beg oonu nuh mek mi heart skip a beat;
Tek care, report good;
And of foolish acts, please beware.

Burning the Political Fires, a flint of Olint


International Money Pile in Cash and Coins

By: Denise N. Fyffe.
Copyright © 2012, Poetess Defy, Denise N. Fyffe

It seems every season there is a political quandary afoot. Today, the thorn in the political parties flesh is Olint.

For those who have a lapse in memory, and only those who did not lose hundreds of thousands or millions in this scheme would have such problems; Olint was one of those money schemes that promised to give you a huge return on your investment, monthly. Needless to say, when the inspectors came knocking on their door, they were found to not be so squeaky clean. While Olint was for the more affluent among us in Jamaica and other countries, CashPlus was the poor man’s, knight in shining amour, which turned out to be an episode from the Bernie Maddof chronicles.

Well one would think that after dealing with every piece of shrapnel that lodged from the David Smith’s Olint debacle, Jamaica would now move on and never hear about it again; except as a reference of what not to do for finance students. But, as with shrapnel, there are some remnants, which you never locate and can never remove.

The current government of Jamaica, headed by the People’s National Party as well as the Jamaica Labour Party recently disclosed that they received a donation from Olint’s coppers and now everyone, with an opinion is demanding or discussing the legal, political, moral and ethical reasons why the money should be returned. Turks and Caicos seem to be gearing up to demand that the PNP and JLP return the money to that country; but let me stir the pot a bit.

If this money is returned and collected, who will it benefit? Will it go back to the pockets of the persons who

English: Bruce Golding Español: Bruce Golding

English: Bruce Golding Español: Bruce Golding (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

were swindled? Or will it simply be forgotten and disappear into the shadows of someone’s pockets? Let’s refer to the 20/20 cricket;  the suave, always smiling, Texan billionaire, Allen Standford was sent to prison for 110 years for his billion dollar ponzi scheme. Should all the cricketers who won prize money from his US$20 million dollar series, give that back too?

In total the amount equals US$7 million dollars, from 2007; now in 2012, from where will the JLP get US$5 million and the PNP US$2 million dollars to give back? And please note, it is the political parties and not the government of Jamaica that will have to return the sum. This, very crucial point, is what got Former JLP Leader and Prime Minister, Bruce Golding caught up into a Manatt enquiry and Jamaicans saying ‘I can’t recall’. Take heed else next season there will be a different kind of political quandary.

Jamaica, She is Royal


By: Denise N. Fyffe.
Copyright © 2012, Poetess defy, Denise N. Fyffe

Jamaica is gorgeous but just like many women, she is truly unaware of the magnitude of that Jamaican beauty.

This is the symptom of those who are blessed to live in island paradises like Hawaii, Bora Bora or even Aruba. They tend to lose the total appreciation for what is right in front of them. Jamaicans are no different. Though, it might be said that through all the socioeconomic difficulties, Jamaica’s majesty, might just be what is keeping the country, particularly, its people from truly sinking into utter deprivation.

With white sand beaches, particularly a gorgeous seven mile stretch in Negril. Black sand beaches guarding the edges of the east and south coast. Flourishing flora and fauna of the epic Jamaican country inlands; bumping up in the sky like the Blue Mountains and Cockpit Country. Tiny oasis of stunning beauty hidden in deep set curvatures of the island, Jamaica. Truly, Jamaicans are far more blessed than generally realized.

The everyday man misses the unique gifts which are upon him daily. Where else does almost every home have a fruit tree in the backyard and generally, there rae several of them. Towering mango trees, ackee trees, breadfruit, or our national flower lignum vitae trees. Succulent cherries, plums, bananas, papayas, apples and so many delicious morsels from God’s garden.

Jamaica is a another of earth’s Mecca, for tourists. Millions of people come each year to enjoy mostly the Northern region of the island. They visit Montego Bay, Negril, Dunns River Falls, Ocho Rios and all the lavish hotels like Beaches, Sandals and Iberostar. Portland also has hidden treasures that have captured the heart of the world’s rich and famous. Many come to Portland for the discretion and privacy; but they are also afforded heavenly beauty spots. The north coast of Jamaica and other tourism centers of the island, is Jamaica’s top economic earner. We are an island that sustains itself off tourism and other industries.

Jamaica, she is royal and truly majestic in every sense. Her bounty is for her children and those lucky enough to traverse her shores.

Bob Marley: The Shooting of a Wailer by Cameron Crowe, January 13, 1977


Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known Jamaican Reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house…

Midnight Raver

Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house. Another man, described by one observer as looking like “a…

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Leroy Smart – Sugar My Coffee


Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Leroy Smart

I was introduced to Leroy Smart about 20 years ago by my then room mate Rich, aka Prime Mundo. He had a stash of really good Jamaican pressed LPs in his closet, one of them was a Leroy Smart record. He told me a story of going to see Leroy perform sometime in the 80′s with a mutual friend in West Philly. They were the only white boys in the joint, and when the lights went down, the patrons who were dressed to the nines, let the Collie flow. Now these guys were in tees and jeans, and afraid they would get caught lighting a joint in the place. Imagine? Relieved, I believe the smoked said joint and that the Leroy Smart show was one of the best Reggae shows he has seen live. If not for the atmosphere, but for Smart’s music and presence as well. Here’s something I dug up a while ago on the cheap. It’s Leroy Smart with “Sugar My Coffee” from his 1979 Lp Let Everyman Survive on G.G.’s/ Hit Records.

Flea Market Funk

I was introduced to Leroy Smart about 20 years ago by my then room mate Rich, aka Prime Mundo. He had a stash of really good Jamaican pressed LPs in his closet, one of them was a Leroy Smart record. He told me a story of going to see Leroy perform sometime in the 80’s with a mutual friend in West Philly. They were the only white boys in the joint, and when the lights went down, the patrons who were dressed to the nines, let the Collie flow. Now these guys were in tees and jeans, and afraid they would get caught lighting a joint in the place. Imagine? Relieved, I believe the smoked said joint and that the Leroy Smart show was one of the best Reggae shows he has seen live. If not for the atmosphere, but for Smart’s music and presence as well. Here’s something I…

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The greatest show on earth

Jamaica Reggae Sumfest

The internationally acclaimed Sumfest happened last weekend, right here in lil ol’ Mobay. We had Trey ladies-keep-your-panties-on Songz and Damian sexiest-rasta-alive Marley headlining the two international nights, though I hear Shabba Ranks stole the show on Friday night. Not that I’m entirely certain who Shabba Ranks is. . .

Reggae Sumfest has origins way back before I was a twinkle in my mother’s eye when it started out as Reggae

I Need a Girl (Trey Songz song)

Sunsplash, an annual festival of Jamaican music that everyone in my parents’ generation likes to bring up as their version of “back when music was actually good”. But my point is that Sumfest has been around for a while, and judging by the consistently insane crowds it draws, it will probably be around for a while longer. Which is a good thing, because I have never been to Sumfest.

It’s kind of sad, really. It happens almost literally in my backyard every year, and every year it comes, I wave, and it passes on its merry, memorable way. It’s a quintessential Jamaican, nay, Montegonian experience that I have yet to acquire. That is a travesty. At first I was too young to go to Sumfest and then as I grew older, I grew less interested in the artistes that were actually showing up. I mean, you wouldn’t catch me dead at Dancehall Night (no offense, but there’s no way I’m paying almost $8000 just to bend over and back it up). And there was this whole phase where I swore off concerts unless a rock band was involved. I’m serious; I joined the Facebook group to prove it.

As Raw As Ever

So Sumfest continues to be marketed as the greatest show on earth, with that iconic symbol of a dancing Rasta (that may or may not be Robert Nesta) pushing its brand beyond local borders. It’s one in a long list of things that keep Jamaica being the leading Caribbean destination (sorry, other touristy islands) and keep Montego Bay being one seriously awesome second city. So what if I haven’t been to Sumfest once in the twenty years I’ve been alive? Maybe I’ll go the year they finally get Fall Out Boy as headliners.

Pax.

Well Read Robin

The internationally acclaimed Sumfest happened last weekend, right here in lil ol’ Mobay. We had Trey ladies-keep-your-panties-on Songz and Damian sexiest-rasta-alive Marley headlining the two international nights, though I hear Shabba Ranks stole the show on Friday night. Not that I’m entirely certain who Shabba Ranks is. . .

Reggae Sumfest has origins way back before I was a twinkle in my mother’s eye when it started out as Reggae Sunsplash, an annual festival of Jamaican music that everyone in my parents’ generation likes to bring up as their version of “back when music was actually good”. But my point is that Sumfest has been around for a while, and judging by the consistently insane crowds it draws, it will probably be around for a while longer. Which is a good thing, because I have never been to Sumfest.

It’s kind of sad, really. It happens almost literally in…

View original post 213 more words