Jamaican Poetry: Seething

By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2017, Poetess Defy, Denise N. Fyffe I hiss mi teet an seethe Like a cobra coiled Deliberating... Execute fury or Recoil; I hiss mi teet an seethe. Mi mind racing thru corridors Like a Amtrak train Seeking recourse, seeking solution. Meanwhile di devils chirp Their song in mi head … Continue reading Jamaican Poetry: Seething

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Bob Marley: The Shooting of a Wailer by Cameron Crowe, January 13, 1977

Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known Jamaican Reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house…

Midnight Raver

Bob Marley: The shooting of a Wailer

Los Angeles – Bob Marley, one of the world’s best-known reggae performers, and three other persons were shot December 3rd when seven gunmen burst onto the grounds of Marley’s home in Kingston, Jamaica, where he and his band, the Wailers, were rehearsing. Miraculously, amid a shower of bullets, there were no fatalities.

Island Records spokesman Jeff Walker said the musicians were on a short break from preparing for their headlining appearance at a free outdoor “Smile Jamaica” festival, cosponsored by Marley and the Jamaican Cultural Ministry December 5th at a Kingston race track. It was 9 p.m. on a Friday evening when two cars roared into the driveway of Marley’s home on Hope Road. After sealing the exit with one car, four of the gunmen began firing into the windows of the house. Another man, described by one observer as looking like “a…

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Leroy Smart – Sugar My Coffee

Jamaican Reggae Artiste, Leroy Smart

I was introduced to Leroy Smart about 20 years ago by my then room mate Rich, aka Prime Mundo. He had a stash of really good Jamaican pressed LPs in his closet, one of them was a Leroy Smart record. He told me a story of going to see Leroy perform sometime in the 80′s with a mutual friend in West Philly. They were the only white boys in the joint, and when the lights went down, the patrons who were dressed to the nines, let the Collie flow. Now these guys were in tees and jeans, and afraid they would get caught lighting a joint in the place. Imagine? Relieved, I believe the smoked said joint and that the Leroy Smart show was one of the best Reggae shows he has seen live. If not for the atmosphere, but for Smart’s music and presence as well. Here’s something I dug up a while ago on the cheap. It’s Leroy Smart with “Sugar My Coffee” from his 1979 Lp Let Everyman Survive on G.G.’s/ Hit Records.

Flea Market Funk

I was introduced to Leroy Smart about 20 years ago by my then room mate Rich, aka Prime Mundo. He had a stash of really good Jamaican pressed LPs in his closet, one of them was a Leroy Smart record. He told me a story of going to see Leroy perform sometime in the 80’s with a mutual friend in West Philly. They were the only white boys in the joint, and when the lights went down, the patrons who were dressed to the nines, let the Collie flow. Now these guys were in tees and jeans, and afraid they would get caught lighting a joint in the place. Imagine? Relieved, I believe the smoked said joint and that the Leroy Smart show was one of the best Reggae shows he has seen live. If not for the atmosphere, but for Smart’s music and presence as well. Here’s something I…

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The greatest show on earth

The internationally acclaimed Sumfest happened last weekend, right here in lil ol’ Mobay. We had Trey ladies-keep-your-panties-on Songz and Damian sexiest-rasta-alive Marley headlining the two international nights, though I hear Shabba Ranks stole the show on Friday night. Not that I’m entirely certain who Shabba Ranks is. . .

Reggae Sumfest has origins way back before I was a twinkle in my mother’s eye when it started out as Reggae

I Need a Girl (Trey Songz song)

Sunsplash, an annual festival of Jamaican music that everyone in my parents’ generation likes to bring up as their version of “back when music was actually good”. But my point is that Sumfest has been around for a while, and judging by the consistently insane crowds it draws, it will probably be around for a while longer. Which is a good thing, because I have never been to Sumfest.

It’s kind of sad, really. It happens almost literally in my backyard every year, and every year it comes, I wave, and it passes on its merry, memorable way. It’s a quintessential Jamaican, nay, Montegonian experience that I have yet to acquire. That is a travesty. At first I was too young to go to Sumfest and then as I grew older, I grew less interested in the artistes that were actually showing up. I mean, you wouldn’t catch me dead at Dancehall Night (no offense, but there’s no way I’m paying almost $8000 just to bend over and back it up). And there was this whole phase where I swore off concerts unless a rock band was involved. I’m serious; I joined the Facebook group to prove it.

As Raw As Ever

So Sumfest continues to be marketed as the greatest show on earth, with that iconic symbol of a dancing Rasta (that may or may not be Robert Nesta) pushing its brand beyond local borders. It’s one in a long list of things that keep Jamaica being the leading Caribbean destination (sorry, other touristy islands) and keep Montego Bay being one seriously awesome second city. So what if I haven’t been to Sumfest once in the twenty years I’ve been alive? Maybe I’ll go the year they finally get Fall Out Boy as headliners.

Pax.

Well Read Robin

The internationally acclaimed Sumfest happened last weekend, right here in lil ol’ Mobay. We had Trey ladies-keep-your-panties-on Songz and Damian sexiest-rasta-alive Marley headlining the two international nights, though I hear Shabba Ranks stole the show on Friday night. Not that I’m entirely certain who Shabba Ranks is. . .

Reggae Sumfest has origins way back before I was a twinkle in my mother’s eye when it started out as Reggae Sunsplash, an annual festival of Jamaican music that everyone in my parents’ generation likes to bring up as their version of “back when music was actually good”. But my point is that Sumfest has been around for a while, and judging by the consistently insane crowds it draws, it will probably be around for a while longer. Which is a good thing, because I have never been to Sumfest.

It’s kind of sad, really. It happens almost literally in…

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Dancehall: The Story of Jamaican Dancehall Culture By Beth Lesser (my review)

How many of us have ever seen photos of artists like Nicodemus, Josie Wales, Yami Bolo, Papa San, Peter Metro, Lone Ranger, Coco Tea, Sister Nancy etc in the prime? The photos are iconic.

I have bought this book many a times to give as presents to friends when on travels to Jamaica and Canada and the recipients all have loved it.

Even now at my house in Old Harbour all my friends want to buy my own copy. No chance!

Every library in Jamaica should have a copy. These artistes in the photos did not have much if any airplay on radio in Jamaica at the time which has meant that reggae fans overseas have more appreciation for the excellent output that made Jamaica well known and respect in countries as further afield as Poland and Japan. So the younger generation have no idea who these artistes were but if they saw these photos the kids could be inspired to dig further.

Be warned – its a very weighty book but important addition to gaining understanding to Jamaican music……

On a slightly side issue……

When you travel around Jamaica you will see new streets and places named after famous athletes, politicians etc. Even in Portmore you see areas called Sandown, Kempton and Aintree which are racecourses in the UK. What’s that about?

But given Jamaica’s greatest consistent global (& respected )export – has been our music – how many of our artistes have ever been publicly acknowledged in some way for their contribution? On the kind of scale like some of our athletes or politicians?

I would love to see a Jackie Mittoo Centre of Music, Jacob Miller Avenue, Delroy Wilson Park, Mighty Diamond Housing Scheme. These people have done wonders in their short but inspiring lives and revered worldwide.

Lets give them the public respect they richly deserve.

wingswithme

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0955481716/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

Without a doubt one of the most important books ever published about the history of post independent Jamaican music. Great for the coffee table or the verandah! A copy of this book would be a great educational reference for young Jamaicans especially who have no clue as to that pivotal era in music.

The photos capture a wonderful period in Jamaican music. As for the poses you just going to LOL when you see them.

How many of us have ever seen photos of artists like Nicodemus, Josie Wales, Yami Bolo, Papa San, Peter Metro, Lone Ranger, Coco Tea, Sister Nancy etc in the prime? The photos are iconic.

I have bought this book many a times to give as presents to friends when on travels to Jamaica and Canada and the recipients all have loved it.

Even now at my house in Old Harbour all my friends want…

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Jamaican History: Jamaica National Flower – Lignum Vitae

National Flower – Lignum Vitae (Guiacum officinale) The Lignum Vitae was found here by Christopher Columbus. Its name, when translated from Latin, means “wood of life” – probably adopted because of its medicinal qualities. The short, compact tree is native to continental tropical American and the West Indies. In Jamaica it grows best in the … Continue reading Jamaican History: Jamaica National Flower – Lignum Vitae

Jamaican History: Jamaica National Bird

    National Bird - The Doctor-Bird (Trochilus polytmus) or Swallow-Tail Hummingbird The doctor bird or swallow tail humming bird, is one of the most outstanding of the 320 species of hummingbirds. It lives only in Jamaica. These birds’ beautiful feathers have no counterpart in the entire bird population and they produce iridescent colours characterstic … Continue reading Jamaican History: Jamaica National Bird

Inner Circle Headlines Jamaica50 Celebration NY Central Park Summer Stage w/ Israel Vibrations & The Mighty Diamonds

To anyone who’s familiar with Inner Circle, the GRAMMY® winning band’s 20-year-plus history in reggae has had a long string of successes. Inner Circle’s special brand of pop-oriented Jamaican beats and energy-filled live performances have allowed the band to transcend the traditional reggae niche and enjoy widespread crossover appeal.

Jamaica and The London 2012 Olympics: Jamaica second in Athletics medal count on day seven

  By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2012, Poetess Defy, Denise N. Fyffe After a superb performance by Jamaica in the 200m men's final, thy are now in second place behind USA in the  Athletics medal count on day seven. Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake and Warren Weir secured Jamaica's third gold, third silver and third bronze … Continue reading Jamaica and The London 2012 Olympics: Jamaica second in Athletics medal count on day seven

Jamaica and The London 2012 Olympics: Jamaica sweeps 200m men’s final, Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, Warren Weir

  By: Denise N. Fyffe. Copyright © 2012, Poetess Defy, Denise N. Fyffe Jamaica's world class, top athletes dominated the men's 200m finals at the London 2012 Olympics and decimated the other competitors. No one was able to catch Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake and Warren Weir who held on to take third place. Usain went … Continue reading Jamaica and The London 2012 Olympics: Jamaica sweeps 200m men’s final, Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, Warren Weir